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The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age of Empire (review)

The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age... 228 journal of world history, march 2012 and Tuskegee, for example—to the center of the world stage. It is not without its flaws, however. Excellent maps of Togo are provided, but the absence of maps of Germany and Alabama is unfathomable. The work would have benefited from some editing of the early chapters. The analysis is uneven, as the first three chapters are nearly half of the text (172 pages), and the remaining two chapters of 77 pages are less than the notes, bibliography, and index of 147 pages. douglas henry daniels University of California, Santa Barbara The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age of Empire. By steven bryan. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. 288 pp. $50.00 (cloth). Alan Milward lamented fifteen years ago that studies of the adop- tion of the gold standard in less developed countries were “almost entirely lacking” and posited that politics and diplomacy had likely been more important than economic logic in shaping their decisions to adopt the gold standard. Steven Bryan’s new book is a welcome addi- tion to the work focusing on experience outside the European core to the gold standard http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age of Empire (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 15, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

228 journal of world history, march 2012 and Tuskegee, for example—to the center of the world stage. It is not without its flaws, however. Excellent maps of Togo are provided, but the absence of maps of Germany and Alabama is unfathomable. The work would have benefited from some editing of the early chapters. The analysis is uneven, as the first three chapters are nearly half of the text (172 pages), and the remaining two chapters of 77 pages are less than the notes, bibliography, and index of 147 pages. douglas henry daniels University of California, Santa Barbara The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age of Empire. By steven bryan. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. 288 pp. $50.00 (cloth). Alan Milward lamented fifteen years ago that studies of the adop- tion of the gold standard in less developed countries were “almost entirely lacking” and posited that politics and diplomacy had likely been more important than economic logic in shaping their decisions to adopt the gold standard. Steven Bryan’s new book is a welcome addi- tion to the work focusing on experience outside the European core to the gold standard

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2012

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