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The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice (review)

The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice (review) Book Reviews 357 The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice. By bonnie g. smith. Cambridge, Mass. and London, U.K.: Harvard University Press, 1998. Pp. viii + 306. $35.00 (cloth). Over the last two decades a respectable number of articles and books on the connection between gender differences and the rise of scientific history have been published. Scholars such as Kathryn Kish Sklar, Natalie Zemon Davis, Bonnie G. Smith, Joan Scott, and others acknowledged the former contributions of women to historiography and studied the gendered contours of the historical profession. The history of Western historiography became enriched with lists of many, almost forgotten women historians in Europe and North America while the concept of gender introduced a new approach for under- standing the process of professionalization in the historical field. Bonnie Smith has integrated her own research of years, and that of others, into a fascinating and daring monograph which sheds light on the historical practice in Western society between 1800 and 1940. Smith explores the hypothesis that professionalism in historiography is based on discredited voices and devalued narratives. Although The Gender of History offers information about men and women historians, Smith elucidates above all the vulnerable representation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews 357 The Gender of History: Men, Women, and Historical Practice. By bonnie g. smith. Cambridge, Mass. and London, U.K.: Harvard University Press, 1998. Pp. viii + 306. $35.00 (cloth). Over the last two decades a respectable number of articles and books on the connection between gender differences and the rise of scientific history have been published. Scholars such as Kathryn Kish Sklar, Natalie Zemon Davis, Bonnie G. Smith, Joan Scott, and others acknowledged the former contributions of women to historiography and studied the gendered contours of the historical profession. The history of Western historiography became enriched with lists of many, almost forgotten women historians in Europe and North America while the concept of gender introduced a new approach for under- standing the process of professionalization in the historical field. Bonnie Smith has integrated her own research of years, and that of others, into a fascinating and daring monograph which sheds light on the historical practice in Western society between 1800 and 1940. Smith explores the hypothesis that professionalism in historiography is based on discredited voices and devalued narratives. Although The Gender of History offers information about men and women historians, Smith elucidates above all the vulnerable representation

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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