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The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global (review)

The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global (review) BOOK REVIEWS The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global. By Virginia Held. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. viii þ 211. Reviewed by Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee University of Hawai`i Virginia Held's latest work, The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global, is another important contribution to the ongoing reconstruction and strengthening of care ethics in the face of continuous criticism, especially from liberal Kantian theorists in both the feminist and non-feminist communities. In Held's book what is of interest to the community of Asian and comparative philosophy is, first, that the struggle of feminist theories in comparison with established canons is reflective of the struggle of Asian and comparative philosophy in finding ways to fit into the mainstream philosophical (Western) discourse; and, second, that Held's advocacy of care ethics is reminiscent of the Confucian ren. However, Held is not particularly aware of the first resemblance and rather boldly dismisses the second in her brief reflection on the merits of Confucianism (pp. 21­22). Despite shortcomings in her attempt to extend the field of feminist discourse beyond the canonic Western traditions, Held's latest reconstruction of care ethics clears new ground for a fruitful dialogue between the feminist and non-feminist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 58 (3) – Jul 16, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global. By Virginia Held. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. viii þ 211. Reviewed by Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee University of Hawai`i Virginia Held's latest work, The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global, is another important contribution to the ongoing reconstruction and strengthening of care ethics in the face of continuous criticism, especially from liberal Kantian theorists in both the feminist and non-feminist communities. In Held's book what is of interest to the community of Asian and comparative philosophy is, first, that the struggle of feminist theories in comparison with established canons is reflective of the struggle of Asian and comparative philosophy in finding ways to fit into the mainstream philosophical (Western) discourse; and, second, that Held's advocacy of care ethics is reminiscent of the Confucian ren. However, Held is not particularly aware of the first resemblance and rather boldly dismisses the second in her brief reflection on the merits of Confucianism (pp. 21­22). Despite shortcomings in her attempt to extend the field of feminist discourse beyond the canonic Western traditions, Held's latest reconstruction of care ethics clears new ground for a fruitful dialogue between the feminist and non-feminist

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 16, 2008

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