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The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100 (review)

The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100 (review) journal of world history, december 2005 implication deemed less important, and thus the individual cases remain atomized and unintelligible within the context of the global economy of which they were a part. The editors of and contributors to this volume do not hang together, thus they risk hanging separately. joel tannenbaum University of Hawai`i at Mänoa The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700 ­2100: Europe, America, and the Third World. By robert w. fogel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. 216 pp. $70.00 (cloth); $23.99 (paper). A review of the most recent book by the 1993 Economics Nobel Prize winner Robert Fogel has to start with the man himself. Fogel has completed now more than four decades of distinguished research on the intersection of history, economics, demography, and public health. His earlier contributions focused mostly on American economic history and more specifically on the history of slavery. As in this book, Fogel's research is data-based and typically involves meticulous construction of large and complicated datasets that enable him to answer previously unanswerable questions. An important dataset that Fogel was instrumental in constructing, and which is utilized at length in this book, is a longitudinal dataset based on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (4)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2005 implication deemed less important, and thus the individual cases remain atomized and unintelligible within the context of the global economy of which they were a part. The editors of and contributors to this volume do not hang together, thus they risk hanging separately. joel tannenbaum University of Hawai`i at Mänoa The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700 ­2100: Europe, America, and the Third World. By robert w. fogel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. 216 pp. $70.00 (cloth); $23.99 (paper). A review of the most recent book by the 1993 Economics Nobel Prize winner Robert Fogel has to start with the man himself. Fogel has completed now more than four decades of distinguished research on the intersection of history, economics, demography, and public health. His earlier contributions focused mostly on American economic history and more specifically on the history of slavery. As in this book, Fogel's research is data-based and typically involves meticulous construction of large and complicated datasets that enable him to answer previously unanswerable questions. An important dataset that Fogel was instrumental in constructing, and which is utilized at length in this book, is a longitudinal dataset based on the

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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