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The End of a Season of Beauty

The End of a Season of Beauty N G U Y E N N G O C T U Old Chin always maintained that selling lottery tickets was a matter of some significance. It gave man hope and, if he won, brought wealth to him. But what was of the utmost personal significance to Chin was that his wandering about selling such tickets helped him find the cai luong opera singer Hong. Chin had followed Hong down three streets as she walked with a load of sweetened porridge on her shoulders. They were both in their late sixties now, so their eyesight wasn't good enough for them to recognize each other after forty-six years of separation. But he had remembered her voice, and it sprang from her shriveled lips clear and strong as a song as she called out her wares. Chin was stunned to see her. Her beauty was gone, and her once high neck was bent under the burdens of life. Catching up, he called out, "Miss Hong!" Tears filled his eyes. He took her hands and invited her to come to the Buoi Chieu [Late Afternoon] House. She wanted to gather some of her belongings first, but he said, "Forget them." Her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The End of a Season of Beauty

Manoa , Volume 15 (1) – May 19, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
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Abstract

N G U Y E N N G O C T U Old Chin always maintained that selling lottery tickets was a matter of some significance. It gave man hope and, if he won, brought wealth to him. But what was of the utmost personal significance to Chin was that his wandering about selling such tickets helped him find the cai luong opera singer Hong. Chin had followed Hong down three streets as she walked with a load of sweetened porridge on her shoulders. They were both in their late sixties now, so their eyesight wasn't good enough for them to recognize each other after forty-six years of separation. But he had remembered her voice, and it sprang from her shriveled lips clear and strong as a song as she called out her wares. Chin was stunned to see her. Her beauty was gone, and her once high neck was bent under the burdens of life. Catching up, he called out, "Miss Hong!" Tears filled his eyes. He took her hands and invited her to come to the Buoi Chieu [Late Afternoon] House. She wanted to gather some of her belongings first, but he said, "Forget them." Her

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 19, 2003

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