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The Distribution of Wealth in Rural China (review)

The Distribution of Wealth in Rural China (review) 500 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 2, Fall 1997 crease his power. Among other things, he was able to expand his economic interests and to reshape his public persona from gangster to philanthropist from within this new institutional framework. In short, by becoming a part of the political system of Shanghai, Du and the Green Gang were able to make out like the "bandits" they were. Brian G. Martin is to be commended for his sober description and objective inquiry into the complex institutional history of China's best-known gang of thugs. William Wei University of Colorado at Boulder William Wei is a professor of history specializing in modern Chinese history and Asian American history. im Terry McKinley. The Distribution of Wealth in Rural China. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1995. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 1-56324-614-7. Paperback $27.50, isbn 1-56324-615-5. This book confirms the old adage, "getting there is half the fun." Here, far more interesting than the actual conclusion is the intricate journey that takes us there. The author's basic conclusion is that wealth in rural China was distributed in a © 1997 by University ofHawai'i Press relatively (compared to other third-world countries) equitable manner in 1988, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Distribution of Wealth in Rural China (review)

China Review International , Volume 4 (2) – Mar 30, 1997

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

500 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 2, Fall 1997 crease his power. Among other things, he was able to expand his economic interests and to reshape his public persona from gangster to philanthropist from within this new institutional framework. In short, by becoming a part of the political system of Shanghai, Du and the Green Gang were able to make out like the "bandits" they were. Brian G. Martin is to be commended for his sober description and objective inquiry into the complex institutional history of China's best-known gang of thugs. William Wei University of Colorado at Boulder William Wei is a professor of history specializing in modern Chinese history and Asian American history. im Terry McKinley. The Distribution of Wealth in Rural China. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1995. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 1-56324-614-7. Paperback $27.50, isbn 1-56324-615-5. This book confirms the old adage, "getting there is half the fun." Here, far more interesting than the actual conclusion is the intricate journey that takes us there. The author's basic conclusion is that wealth in rural China was distributed in a © 1997 by University ofHawai'i Press relatively (compared to other third-world countries) equitable manner in 1988,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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