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The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science (review)

The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science (review) This is altogether a very fine piece of analysis, although this study of human evolution surprisingly evades any sort of gendered treatment of early human development and eludes true cohesiveness with the inclusion of a last chapter that appears out of place. In the span of a mere sixteen pages, the author attempts to cover the origins of settled life, including the cultivation of plants, the domestication of animals, and the emergence of complex societies. While this coverage is well enough conceived, its extreme brevity fails to do justice to a complicated subject deserving of its own volume. That being said, Ian Tattersall's masterful treatment of early human evolution represents an auspicious point of departure for Oxford's new series on world history. herbert f. ziegler University of Hawai`i at Mänoa The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science. By arun bala. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. 244 pp. $74.95 (cloth). The call for acknowledging the birth of modern science as a result of the integration of several civilizations rather than the unique genesis of Western civilization has been made over the years by many prominent scientists, philosophers, and historians. Among those scholars one could list Thomas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 19 (4) – Jan 16, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai‘i Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

This is altogether a very fine piece of analysis, although this study of human evolution surprisingly evades any sort of gendered treatment of early human development and eludes true cohesiveness with the inclusion of a last chapter that appears out of place. In the span of a mere sixteen pages, the author attempts to cover the origins of settled life, including the cultivation of plants, the domestication of animals, and the emergence of complex societies. While this coverage is well enough conceived, its extreme brevity fails to do justice to a complicated subject deserving of its own volume. That being said, Ian Tattersall's masterful treatment of early human evolution represents an auspicious point of departure for Oxford's new series on world history. herbert f. ziegler University of Hawai`i at Mänoa The Dialogue of Civilizations in the Birth of Modern Science. By arun bala. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. 244 pp. $74.95 (cloth). The call for acknowledging the birth of modern science as a result of the integration of several civilizations rather than the unique genesis of Western civilization has been made over the years by many prominent scientists, philosophers, and historians. Among those scholars one could list Thomas

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 16, 2008

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