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The Denial of Human Dignity in the Age of Human Rights under Australia’s Operation Sovereign Borders

The Denial of Human Dignity in the Age of Human Rights under Australia’s Operation Sovereign... The Denial of Human Dignity in the Age of Human Rights under Australia’s Operation Sovereign Borders J C Salyer I n 2017, Mohammad was working in exchange for room and board at a small surf resort in New Ireland, Papua New Guinea (PNG). An Austra- lian lawyer had made this arrangement for him so he could spend some time off of Manus Island, where he had been detained since attempting to reach Australia by boat from Indonesia to claim asylum. Four years earlier in Iran, Mohammad had been a university student who was politi- cally active both by writing against the government and by participat- ing in protests. When his father saw him on a television news broadcast attending a protest, he realized it was no longer safe for him in Iran, and at the age of twenty-five, he fled his home. Because, at that time, Irani- ans could obtain a visa on arrival in Indonesia, Mohammad went there and arranged to go to Australia by boat. His boat was intercepted by an Australian vessel on 23 July 2013, four days after the prime ministers of Australia and PNG signed the Regional Resettlement Agreement, which stipulated that Australia would http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Denial of Human Dignity in the Age of Human Rights under Australia’s Operation Sovereign Borders

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 32 (2) – Dec 11, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

The Denial of Human Dignity in the Age of Human Rights under Australia’s Operation Sovereign Borders J C Salyer I n 2017, Mohammad was working in exchange for room and board at a small surf resort in New Ireland, Papua New Guinea (PNG). An Austra- lian lawyer had made this arrangement for him so he could spend some time off of Manus Island, where he had been detained since attempting to reach Australia by boat from Indonesia to claim asylum. Four years earlier in Iran, Mohammad had been a university student who was politi- cally active both by writing against the government and by participat- ing in protests. When his father saw him on a television news broadcast attending a protest, he realized it was no longer safe for him in Iran, and at the age of twenty-five, he fled his home. Because, at that time, Irani- ans could obtain a visa on arrival in Indonesia, Mohammad went there and arranged to go to Australia by boat. His boat was intercepted by an Australian vessel on 23 July 2013, four days after the prime ministers of Australia and PNG signed the Regional Resettlement Agreement, which stipulated that Australia would

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 11, 2020

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