Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Day the Sun Rose in the West: Bikini, the Lucky Dragon, and I (review)

The Day the Sun Rose in the West: Bikini, the Lucky Dragon, and I (review) book and media reviews interrelated and intersecting trajectories representing growth through time and space. One trajectory moves upward, through a central trunk. The other moves outward, through branches that bifurcate right and left from the trunk, creating multiple "sides." Taylor sees something extraordinary captured in this land-tree (which he also finds expressed in other ways): a Sia Raga reconciliation of the problematic expressed in Sahlins's "structure of the conjuncture." Chief Ruben's tree incorporates at once an "atemporal cartography" and "a spatialized temporality and itinerant history" of the Sia Raga (101). It possesses a built-in reconciliation of history and structure, in which events and ideas happen at once, and the language of time is condensed into that of space and place. For all its impressive insights, Taylor's book is not without its problems. For example, although much of the book revolves around the tensionfilled duality between Sia Raga and Western/foreign ontological and historiographical codes and ways of being, Taylor only broadly touches on what he means by the Western "side." He unsatisfyingly sidesteps the issue by stating simply that his analysis need not imply radical differences from Western thought, nor similarities and correlates. It also would have been fascinating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Day the Sun Rose in the West: Bikini, the Lucky Dragon, and I (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 24 (1) – Feb 12, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-day-the-sun-rose-in-the-west-bikini-the-lucky-dragon-and-i-review-KLjmS3kDcY
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews interrelated and intersecting trajectories representing growth through time and space. One trajectory moves upward, through a central trunk. The other moves outward, through branches that bifurcate right and left from the trunk, creating multiple "sides." Taylor sees something extraordinary captured in this land-tree (which he also finds expressed in other ways): a Sia Raga reconciliation of the problematic expressed in Sahlins's "structure of the conjuncture." Chief Ruben's tree incorporates at once an "atemporal cartography" and "a spatialized temporality and itinerant history" of the Sia Raga (101). It possesses a built-in reconciliation of history and structure, in which events and ideas happen at once, and the language of time is condensed into that of space and place. For all its impressive insights, Taylor's book is not without its problems. For example, although much of the book revolves around the tensionfilled duality between Sia Raga and Western/foreign ontological and historiographical codes and ways of being, Taylor only broadly touches on what he means by the Western "side." He unsatisfyingly sidesteps the issue by stating simply that his analysis need not imply radical differences from Western thought, nor similarities and correlates. It also would have been fascinating

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 12, 2012

There are no references for this article.