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The Crisis of Authority: Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners

The Crisis of Authority: Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners The Crisis of Authority Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners Rita M. Gross University of Wisconsin­Eau Claire, USA Lotus Garden, Stanley, USA As a Buddhist scholar-practitioner who is also a feminist, I have multiple loyalties. The potential for conflict between different standards could be great, and I have often been asked whether my fundamental loyalty is to Buddhist standards and Buddhist teachers, to the values of feminism, or to standards of academic scholarship. This is a question I always refuse to answer because I myself do not experience any irreconcilable conflicts among these loyalties. Nor is this lack of conflict due to my keeping these three interests separate in my thinking or my work. Clearly, I have been more than explicit in the way that I have brought feminist concerns into my writings on Buddhism, my work as a Buddhist dharma teacher, and other issues I have taken up as an academic scholar. Though most scholars would be much less familiar with how I teach when I function as a Buddhist teacher at a meditation center, I am well known in those circles as someone who brings nonsectarian, feminist, and academic perspectives to Buddhists teachings. Finally, I was "out" http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

The Crisis of Authority: Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 30 (1) – Sep 30, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9472
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Abstract

The Crisis of Authority Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners Rita M. Gross University of Wisconsin­Eau Claire, USA Lotus Garden, Stanley, USA As a Buddhist scholar-practitioner who is also a feminist, I have multiple loyalties. The potential for conflict between different standards could be great, and I have often been asked whether my fundamental loyalty is to Buddhist standards and Buddhist teachers, to the values of feminism, or to standards of academic scholarship. This is a question I always refuse to answer because I myself do not experience any irreconcilable conflicts among these loyalties. Nor is this lack of conflict due to my keeping these three interests separate in my thinking or my work. Clearly, I have been more than explicit in the way that I have brought feminist concerns into my writings on Buddhism, my work as a Buddhist dharma teacher, and other issues I have taken up as an academic scholar. Though most scholars would be much less familiar with how I teach when I function as a Buddhist teacher at a meditation center, I am well known in those circles as someone who brings nonsectarian, feminist, and academic perspectives to Buddhists teachings. Finally, I was "out"

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 30, 2010

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