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The Creation of the British Atlantic World (review)

The Creation of the British Atlantic World (review) 3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 339 Book Reviews The Creation of the British Atlantic World. Edited by eliza- beth mancke and carole shammas. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005). 408 pp. $52.00 (cloth). Atlantic history, or the study of the motion and exchange of ideas, people, culture, and capital between Europe, Africa, and the Ameri- cas, has become much more than a cottage industry over the past two decades. Building off of but diverging from the imperial history of Charles Andrews and others, Atlanticists have presented a powerful challenge to the historiographical hegemony of the nation-state. In her introduction to The Creation of the British Atlantic World, Carole Shammas explains that “Atlantic history has little time for or interest in examining the place of imperial politics in the shaping of the trans- atlantic experience” (p. 5). Instead, Atlanticists use “nonpolitical cau- sation” to explain how a British Atlantic world was crafted in the early modern era by various transnational and subnational groups (p. 5). Merchants, African slaves, Indians, missionaries, migrants, botanists, painters, Quakers, and lawyers were all crucial actors in the produc- tion of this British Atlantic, and the volume under review engages this multitude of subjects and perspectives http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Creation of the British Atlantic World (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 17 (3) – Aug 22, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 339 Book Reviews The Creation of the British Atlantic World. Edited by eliza- beth mancke and carole shammas. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005). 408 pp. $52.00 (cloth). Atlantic history, or the study of the motion and exchange of ideas, people, culture, and capital between Europe, Africa, and the Ameri- cas, has become much more than a cottage industry over the past two decades. Building off of but diverging from the imperial history of Charles Andrews and others, Atlanticists have presented a powerful challenge to the historiographical hegemony of the nation-state. In her introduction to The Creation of the British Atlantic World, Carole Shammas explains that “Atlantic history has little time for or interest in examining the place of imperial politics in the shaping of the trans- atlantic experience” (p. 5). Instead, Atlanticists use “nonpolitical cau- sation” to explain how a British Atlantic world was crafted in the early modern era by various transnational and subnational groups (p. 5). Merchants, African slaves, Indians, missionaries, migrants, botanists, painters, Quakers, and lawyers were all crucial actors in the produc- tion of this British Atlantic, and the volume under review engages this multitude of subjects and perspectives

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 22, 2006

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