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The Complete Idiot's Guide to Understanding Buddhism (review)

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Understanding Buddhism (review) I’ll embrace my fate at the hour of my death! I’ll lift this little chin of mine—lift it to the heavens. Only now do I understand that this death Is the consequence of all I was unable to feel. Yes, I’ll embrace my fate! And then I’ll finally know how it all feels! For whatever reason, certain poets become spokespersons for their age. Chuya seems to have won that role, perhaps by being both in and of his era. A bohemian by nature, he was deeply impassioned about life yet somehow alienated from the world, wavering between hopeful nostalgia and existential crisis. When he is writ- ing about nature, it’s always through the prism of a damaged, and human, psyche. Here is an example from “The Twilight of This Spring Day”: Little by little, the temple in the pasture reddens The wheel of the horse-drawn wagon is dripping oil If I make some kind of remark at this historical moment I’m heckled—heckled by the sky and mountains For years, Chuya has been a lasting cultural icon whose poetry has appealed to a wide range of Japanese readers. His somewhat wild persona—drinking and smashing up places, even landing in jail—has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Understanding Buddhism (review)

Manoa , Volume 15 (1) – May 19, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

I’ll embrace my fate at the hour of my death! I’ll lift this little chin of mine—lift it to the heavens. Only now do I understand that this death Is the consequence of all I was unable to feel. Yes, I’ll embrace my fate! And then I’ll finally know how it all feels! For whatever reason, certain poets become spokespersons for their age. Chuya seems to have won that role, perhaps by being both in and of his era. A bohemian by nature, he was deeply impassioned about life yet somehow alienated from the world, wavering between hopeful nostalgia and existential crisis. When he is writ- ing about nature, it’s always through the prism of a damaged, and human, psyche. Here is an example from “The Twilight of This Spring Day”: Little by little, the temple in the pasture reddens The wheel of the horse-drawn wagon is dripping oil If I make some kind of remark at this historical moment I’m heckled—heckled by the sky and mountains For years, Chuya has been a lasting cultural icon whose poetry has appealed to a wide range of Japanese readers. His somewhat wild persona—drinking and smashing up places, even landing in jail—has

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 19, 2003

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