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The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature (review)

The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature (review) Book Reviews author, one can find more in-depth discussions of these creators of the modern who were inspired by Asian models by going to authors who have focused specifically on each theatre practitioner. Rather than doing the more in-depth discussion of these individuals, I felt that Savarese in this section is forming a background for the work he is really thinking toward throughout--the efforts of Eugenio Barba, who seeks to "consider that which lies beneath those luminous and seductive epidermises and discern the organs that keep them [Asian physical theatres] alive, then the poles of the comparison blend into a single profile: that of a Eurasian Theatre" (p. 557). Savarese and Barba want (like Jerzy Grotowski, who inspired Barba in the first place) to find basis of actorcentered theatre, where neither word or technology lead, but the sound and movement coming from the performing body. The book has aimed toward this conclusion. There is much that is left out--Southeast Asia gets only passing attention; China and even India are less focused on than Japan. The perspective is more of Europe contemplating Asia than vice versa. The sources the author mines are mostly European or Japanese. The writing sometime http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 29 (1) – Jul 11, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews author, one can find more in-depth discussions of these creators of the modern who were inspired by Asian models by going to authors who have focused specifically on each theatre practitioner. Rather than doing the more in-depth discussion of these individuals, I felt that Savarese in this section is forming a background for the work he is really thinking toward throughout--the efforts of Eugenio Barba, who seeks to "consider that which lies beneath those luminous and seductive epidermises and discern the organs that keep them [Asian physical theatres] alive, then the poles of the comparison blend into a single profile: that of a Eurasian Theatre" (p. 557). Savarese and Barba want (like Jerzy Grotowski, who inspired Barba in the first place) to find basis of actorcentered theatre, where neither word or technology lead, but the sound and movement coming from the performing body. The book has aimed toward this conclusion. There is much that is left out--Southeast Asia gets only passing attention; China and even India are less focused on than Japan. The perspective is more of Europe contemplating Asia than vice versa. The sources the author mines are mostly European or Japanese. The writing sometime

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 11, 2012

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