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The Colonial Staged: Theatre in Colonial Calcutta by Sudipto Chatterjee (review)

The Colonial Staged: Theatre in Colonial Calcutta by Sudipto Chatterjee (review) Reviews 683 courts, as a performance, Bharucha tries to rewrite the performativity of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa. Rather than limiting the book to staged performances of plays to understand the connection between terror and performance, Bharucha engages with the larger spectrum of performances in everyday life. A case in point is chapter 4, “Performing Non-Violence in the Age of Terror,” in which Bharucha analyzes the widespread performance of the famous Dandi March or Salt March of Mahatma Gandhi. He reads the march to illustrate how vio- lence on the satyagrahis by the British seemed staged; the mise en scène of collective resistance is used to show how nonviolence is performed. Bharu- cha’s approach to read lived experiences as still images extracted from some performance is unorthodox and refreshing. The book offers an expert guide on terror scholarship through the interdisciplinary fields of performance studies, sociology, history, ethics, and philosophy. While there have been many studies of terror, the thing that clearly distinguishes Bharucha’s book from previous research is its methodology and style of narration. Unlike Bharucha’s earlier books, such as Theatre and the World: Performance and the Politics of Culture (1993) and The Politics of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

The Colonial Staged: Theatre in Colonial Calcutta by Sudipto Chatterjee (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 32 (2) – Sep 14, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

Reviews 683 courts, as a performance, Bharucha tries to rewrite the performativity of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa. Rather than limiting the book to staged performances of plays to understand the connection between terror and performance, Bharucha engages with the larger spectrum of performances in everyday life. A case in point is chapter 4, “Performing Non-Violence in the Age of Terror,” in which Bharucha analyzes the widespread performance of the famous Dandi March or Salt March of Mahatma Gandhi. He reads the march to illustrate how vio- lence on the satyagrahis by the British seemed staged; the mise en scène of collective resistance is used to show how nonviolence is performed. Bharu- cha’s approach to read lived experiences as still images extracted from some performance is unorthodox and refreshing. The book offers an expert guide on terror scholarship through the interdisciplinary fields of performance studies, sociology, history, ethics, and philosophy. While there have been many studies of terror, the thing that clearly distinguishes Bharucha’s book from previous research is its methodology and style of narration. Unlike Bharucha’s earlier books, such as Theatre and the World: Performance and the Politics of Culture (1993) and The Politics of

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 14, 2015

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