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The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (review)

The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (review) The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. By samuel p. huntington. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. Pp. 367. $26 (cloth); $14 (paper). Surprisingly, the Library of Congress has classified Samuel Huntington's Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order as "history," which it assuredly is not, either in scope or in method. Rather, Huntington's book belongs in the realm of political science speculation, gussied up with what the author believes to be "history"-- or at least numerous references to "history tells us" or "throughout history," to prove his points. So why is The Clash of Civilizations being reviewed here? Because Huntington makes a big claim about history, and especially about historical continuity--a claim that world historians should be made aware of. Huntington's thesis is that the bipolarity of the Cold War obscured a fundamental fact about the world and its history: namely, that the largest units of common human identity, difference, action, and conflict have been, and once again are, civilizations, which are drawing together once again the countries and peoples previously divided by Cold War politics. From this premise, Huntington goes on to make foreign policy recommendations for the United States: understand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. By samuel p. huntington. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. Pp. 367. $26 (cloth); $14 (paper). Surprisingly, the Library of Congress has classified Samuel Huntington's Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order as "history," which it assuredly is not, either in scope or in method. Rather, Huntington's book belongs in the realm of political science speculation, gussied up with what the author believes to be "history"-- or at least numerous references to "history tells us" or "throughout history," to prove his points. So why is The Clash of Civilizations being reviewed here? Because Huntington makes a big claim about history, and especially about historical continuity--a claim that world historians should be made aware of. Huntington's thesis is that the bipolarity of the Cold War obscured a fundamental fact about the world and its history: namely, that the largest units of common human identity, difference, action, and conflict have been, and once again are, civilizations, which are drawing together once again the countries and peoples previously divided by Cold War politics. From this premise, Huntington goes on to make foreign policy recommendations for the United States: understand

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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