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The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film: Configurations of Space, Time, and Gender (review)

The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film: Configurations of Space, Time, and Gender (review) 588 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 2, Fall 1997 In the final analysis, tiiis reader was left with the feeling that Yick's thesis needs some modification. In particular, it would seem that the skill of the CCP was only one of several factors that led to the CCP triumph in Beiping and Tianjin. The GMD's troubles with the economy, with corruption, with personal armies (and, presumably, regionalism), with suspicion of students (and especially students who had stayed in North China during the Japanese occupation), and with its identification with collaborators, American soldiers, and the defeated Japanese--all these factors, many of which seem only remotely related to the CCP's North China organizers, probably played at least as large a role in the GMD collapse and defeat. But Yick's contention that the CCP never forgot the cities does seem true enough. Symbolically, the cities, and especially Beiping, were the centers of Chinese civilization and control. In spite of the Yan'an experience, it is hard to imagine that Mao and the other CCP leaders would have been satisfied if they had not been able to capture the cities from within--as, due in large part to the defection of Fu Zuoyi, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film: Configurations of Space, Time, and Gender (review)

China Review International , Volume 4 (2) – Mar 30, 1997

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Abstract

588 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 2, Fall 1997 In the final analysis, tiiis reader was left with the feeling that Yick's thesis needs some modification. In particular, it would seem that the skill of the CCP was only one of several factors that led to the CCP triumph in Beiping and Tianjin. The GMD's troubles with the economy, with corruption, with personal armies (and, presumably, regionalism), with suspicion of students (and especially students who had stayed in North China during the Japanese occupation), and with its identification with collaborators, American soldiers, and the defeated Japanese--all these factors, many of which seem only remotely related to the CCP's North China organizers, probably played at least as large a role in the GMD collapse and defeat. But Yick's contention that the CCP never forgot the cities does seem true enough. Symbolically, the cities, and especially Beiping, were the centers of Chinese civilization and control. In spite of the Yan'an experience, it is hard to imagine that Mao and the other CCP leaders would have been satisfied if they had not been able to capture the cities from within--as, due in large part to the defection of Fu Zuoyi,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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