Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Chinese Pursuit of Happiness. Anxieties, Hopes, and Moral Tensions in Everyday Life ed. by Becky Yang Hsu and Richard Madsen (review)

The Chinese Pursuit of Happiness. Anxieties, Hopes, and Moral Tensions in Everyday Life ed. by...  China Review International: Vol. , No. ,  Becky Yang Hsu and Richard Madsen, editors. The Chinese Pursuit of Happiness. Anxieties, Hopes, and Moral Tensions in Everyday Life. Oakland: University of California Press, . vii,  pp. Paperback $., ISBN ----. It is difficult to escape happiness these days. The term has wiggled its way into popular, corporate, and political discourse with a persistence that has become predictable. Few are the workshops—for academics, managers, and students— that do not reference the h-word, not to speak of the many shelves in bookstores all over the world, including China, that promise ways and formulas to achieve a happier life. Those professing to have the answers, mostly arrived through quantitative data analysis relying on psychology or economics, are the same people who have told us for centuries how to live our lives, namely middle-aged White men, many of them Americans. Happiness as the telos of human existence has been debated since Aristotle, of course, but happiness as subject of scientific and academic investigation has only really appeared in the last twenty years. Attention to happiness surged with the publication of the first World Happiness Report in  in support of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Chinese Pursuit of Happiness. Anxieties, Hopes, and Moral Tensions in Everyday Life ed. by Becky Yang Hsu and Richard Madsen (review)

China Review International , Volume 25 (2) – Jul 23, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-chinese-pursuit-of-happiness-anxieties-hopes-and-moral-tensions-in-46PvhUGkzI
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

 China Review International: Vol. , No. ,  Becky Yang Hsu and Richard Madsen, editors. The Chinese Pursuit of Happiness. Anxieties, Hopes, and Moral Tensions in Everyday Life. Oakland: University of California Press, . vii,  pp. Paperback $., ISBN ----. It is difficult to escape happiness these days. The term has wiggled its way into popular, corporate, and political discourse with a persistence that has become predictable. Few are the workshops—for academics, managers, and students— that do not reference the h-word, not to speak of the many shelves in bookstores all over the world, including China, that promise ways and formulas to achieve a happier life. Those professing to have the answers, mostly arrived through quantitative data analysis relying on psychology or economics, are the same people who have told us for centuries how to live our lives, namely middle-aged White men, many of them Americans. Happiness as the telos of human existence has been debated since Aristotle, of course, but happiness as subject of scientific and academic investigation has only really appeared in the last twenty years. Attention to happiness surged with the publication of the first World Happiness Report in  in support of the

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 23, 2020

There are no references for this article.