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The Chinese in Europe (review)

The Chinese in Europe (review) Gregor Benton and Frank N. Pieke, editors. The Chinese in Europe. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998; London: Macmillan Press, Ltd., 1998. xi, 390 pp. Hardcover $75.00, ISBN 0­312­17526­4. Although Chinese people have been migrating overseas for over a millennium, mainly following trade routes into what is today Southeast Asia, modern Chinese migration started only in the mid-nineteenth century. From the time the British opened Chinese ports to "free trade" in the 1840s, tens of millions of people left mainland China for locations around the world. A large number of those migrants returned to China at some point, some only after their deaths, when their bones were repatriated to Chinese soil. Many others, however, remained in their new homes, where they established lives for themselves, their children, and their children's children. Some intermarried with the local population and came to identify so completely with the locale that their Chineseness faded away entirely. Others, however, continued to identify themselves as Chinese, even as they reconstructed what that identity meant in their particular societies. © 1999 by University of Hawai`i Press Reviews 381 © 1999 by University of Hawai`i Press This worldwide migration and settlement have spawned a sizable literature http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Chinese in Europe (review)

China Review International , Volume 6 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright by University of Hawaii Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
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Abstract

Gregor Benton and Frank N. Pieke, editors. The Chinese in Europe. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998; London: Macmillan Press, Ltd., 1998. xi, 390 pp. Hardcover $75.00, ISBN 0­312­17526­4. Although Chinese people have been migrating overseas for over a millennium, mainly following trade routes into what is today Southeast Asia, modern Chinese migration started only in the mid-nineteenth century. From the time the British opened Chinese ports to "free trade" in the 1840s, tens of millions of people left mainland China for locations around the world. A large number of those migrants returned to China at some point, some only after their deaths, when their bones were repatriated to Chinese soil. Many others, however, remained in their new homes, where they established lives for themselves, their children, and their children's children. Some intermarried with the local population and came to identify so completely with the locale that their Chineseness faded away entirely. Others, however, continued to identify themselves as Chinese, even as they reconstructed what that identity meant in their particular societies. © 1999 by University of Hawai`i Press Reviews 381 © 1999 by University of Hawai`i Press This worldwide migration and settlement have spawned a sizable literature

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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