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The Chinese Continuum of Self-Cultivation: A Confucian-Deweyan Learning Model by Christine A. Hale (review)

The Chinese Continuum of Self-Cultivation: A Confucian-Deweyan Learning Model by Christine A.... Reviews 145 appoint Burlingame as its own "Ambassador from China to all the Treaty Powers." China's Zongli Yamen (foreign ministry) recognized the need to improve communication with the West, especially as the ten-year revision of the Treaty of Tianjin (1858) loomed. Burlingame headed a mission (with two Qing officials) that successfully negotiated a treaty with the United States based on mutual respect and equality, including free immigration from each to the other. Fittingly, the Burlingame Treaty was signed in 1868 on the same day that the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified. The mission traveled on to London, Paris, and St. Petersburg but failed to produce additional equal treaties. The cooperative model was possible in the United States during Reconstruction, but that moment would soon pass, to the detriment of equality in domestic race relations and in foreign affairs. Under pressure from anti-Chinese racism on the West Coast, the United States renegotiated the Burlingame Treaty in 1880 in order to allow for a temporary suspension of immigration, paving the way for Chinese exclusion. Mae M. Ngai Mae M. Ngai is the Lung Professor of Asian American studies and professor of history at Columbia University. Her research area is transnational migration, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Chinese Continuum of Self-Cultivation: A Confucian-Deweyan Learning Model by Christine A. Hale (review)

China Review International , Volume 21 (2) – Nov 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 145 appoint Burlingame as its own "Ambassador from China to all the Treaty Powers." China's Zongli Yamen (foreign ministry) recognized the need to improve communication with the West, especially as the ten-year revision of the Treaty of Tianjin (1858) loomed. Burlingame headed a mission (with two Qing officials) that successfully negotiated a treaty with the United States based on mutual respect and equality, including free immigration from each to the other. Fittingly, the Burlingame Treaty was signed in 1868 on the same day that the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified. The mission traveled on to London, Paris, and St. Petersburg but failed to produce additional equal treaties. The cooperative model was possible in the United States during Reconstruction, but that moment would soon pass, to the detriment of equality in domestic race relations and in foreign affairs. Under pressure from anti-Chinese racism on the West Coast, the United States renegotiated the Burlingame Treaty in 1880 in order to allow for a temporary suspension of immigration, paving the way for Chinese exclusion. Mae M. Ngai Mae M. Ngai is the Lung Professor of Asian American studies and professor of history at Columbia University. Her research area is transnational migration,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 28, 2014

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