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The Character of Logic in India (review)

The Character of Logic in India (review) The Character of Logic in India. By Bimal Krishna Matilal. Edited by Jonardon Ganeri and Heeraman Tiwari. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998. Pp. ix 180. Reviewed by Michael G. Barnhart City University of New York, Kingsborough Few subjects are as bewilderingly complex as the topic of Indian theories of knowledge and valid inference. They are a thicket of scholastic intrigue, replete with enough arcane distinctions to drive the most hardened logician to exhausted despair. Consequently, it is a genuine accomplishment, if not a universally recognized one, to succeed in actually sorting out these discussions and bring the light of intelligibility and relevance to the subject. The late Bimal Krishna Matilal left us a fitting legacy in this small, unfinished, and posthumous masterpiece of clarity, The Character of Logic in India. Surveying the development of Indian accounts of valid inference, Matilal attempts essentially two things. One is, of course, to identify and explain the distinctive aspects of such accounts. This by itself is a formidable challenge due to the complexity of the Indian philosophical scene with its various traditions of scholarly discourse, whether they be Buddhist, Jaina, or the ``Six Schools.'' But Matilal also attempts to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Character of Logic in India (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 51 (4) – Jan 10, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Character of Logic in India. By Bimal Krishna Matilal. Edited by Jonardon Ganeri and Heeraman Tiwari. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998. Pp. ix 180. Reviewed by Michael G. Barnhart City University of New York, Kingsborough Few subjects are as bewilderingly complex as the topic of Indian theories of knowledge and valid inference. They are a thicket of scholastic intrigue, replete with enough arcane distinctions to drive the most hardened logician to exhausted despair. Consequently, it is a genuine accomplishment, if not a universally recognized one, to succeed in actually sorting out these discussions and bring the light of intelligibility and relevance to the subject. The late Bimal Krishna Matilal left us a fitting legacy in this small, unfinished, and posthumous masterpiece of clarity, The Character of Logic in India. Surveying the development of Indian accounts of valid inference, Matilal attempts essentially two things. One is, of course, to identify and explain the distinctive aspects of such accounts. This by itself is a formidable challenge due to the complexity of the Indian philosophical scene with its various traditions of scholarly discourse, whether they be Buddhist, Jaina, or the ``Six Schools.'' But Matilal also attempts to

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2001

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