Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto (review)

The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto (review) Reviews F I C T I O N The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto by Kenji Nakagami. Translated by Eve Zimmerman. Berkeley: Stone Bridge Press, 1999. 192 pages, paper $12.95. Twenty-nine-year-old Kenji Nakagami was working as a baggage handler at Haneda Airport in 1976 when his novella, "The Cape," was awarded the Akutagawa Shö, Japan's premier literary prize. Nakagami, who was born into Japan's outcast burakumin society, was the first in his family to "get letters." In his writing, he concentrated on the hardscrabble life of the people in his community: his stories of the roji (alley) are populated by ditchdiggers, prostitutes, gamblers, bums, and drug addicts. There are no cherry blossoms or whispered haiku in The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto, but instead sweaty armpits, pig piss, and bloody knives. Nakagami's fictional world is dirty realism at its grimiest. "The Cape" centers around a family much like Nakagami's own. The protagonist, twenty-four-year-old Akiyuki, is the illegitimate son of a generally despised drifter known only as "that man." Akiyuki lives with his mother, stepfather, and stepbrother, and near his half-sister, Mie, a child from his mother's first marriage. (Translator Eve Zimmerman kindly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto (review)

Manoa , Volume 13 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-cape-and-other-stories-from-the-japanese-ghetto-review-GReLrtjj38
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews F I C T I O N The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto by Kenji Nakagami. Translated by Eve Zimmerman. Berkeley: Stone Bridge Press, 1999. 192 pages, paper $12.95. Twenty-nine-year-old Kenji Nakagami was working as a baggage handler at Haneda Airport in 1976 when his novella, "The Cape," was awarded the Akutagawa Shö, Japan's premier literary prize. Nakagami, who was born into Japan's outcast burakumin society, was the first in his family to "get letters." In his writing, he concentrated on the hardscrabble life of the people in his community: his stories of the roji (alley) are populated by ditchdiggers, prostitutes, gamblers, bums, and drug addicts. There are no cherry blossoms or whispered haiku in The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto, but instead sweaty armpits, pig piss, and bloody knives. Nakagami's fictional world is dirty realism at its grimiest. "The Cape" centers around a family much like Nakagami's own. The protagonist, twenty-four-year-old Akiyuki, is the illegitimate son of a generally despised drifter known only as "that man." Akiyuki lives with his mother, stepfather, and stepbrother, and near his half-sister, Mie, a child from his mother's first marriage. (Translator Eve Zimmerman kindly

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.