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The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders (review)

The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders (review) the contemporary pacific · spring 2000 and history have been disrupted-- theoretically and through actual shifts within postcolonial societies. Although historians were once confident to write grand regional narratives elsewhere, they have been more reticent in the Pacific. Four, among other, impediments blocked an authorized history of the Pacific. These included not only insufficient accessible research, but also a lack of confidence. The new wave of Pacific historians emerging from the 1970s, particularly the "Canberra school," was usually reluctant to present generalizations about the region, preferring to speak about their specializations. Third, many historians were motivated to write history from the inside out, to revise the imperial school of Pacific history. This emerging reluctance to locate the subject within colonial narratives followed the decolonization of Pacific colonies. By the 1980s historiographical issues of indigenous voices, authenticity, and the kinds of history being published began to be contested. A fourth impediment was the economics of publishing. Pacific Islanders were absent in global histories. This marginality appeared to verify the lack of a market for a regional history. Donald Denoon and his fellow contributors have therefore taken a brave step in facing these challenges. They have given splendid vent to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (1) – Feb 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · spring 2000 and history have been disrupted-- theoretically and through actual shifts within postcolonial societies. Although historians were once confident to write grand regional narratives elsewhere, they have been more reticent in the Pacific. Four, among other, impediments blocked an authorized history of the Pacific. These included not only insufficient accessible research, but also a lack of confidence. The new wave of Pacific historians emerging from the 1970s, particularly the "Canberra school," was usually reluctant to present generalizations about the region, preferring to speak about their specializations. Third, many historians were motivated to write history from the inside out, to revise the imperial school of Pacific history. This emerging reluctance to locate the subject within colonial narratives followed the decolonization of Pacific colonies. By the 1980s historiographical issues of indigenous voices, authenticity, and the kinds of history being published began to be contested. A fourth impediment was the economics of publishing. Pacific Islanders were absent in global histories. This marginality appeared to verify the lack of a market for a regional history. Donald Denoon and his fellow contributors have therefore taken a brave step in facing these challenges. They have given splendid vent to

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 1, 2000

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