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The Caitanya Vaịṣnava Vedānta of Jīva Gosvāmī: When Knowledge Meets Devotion (review)

The Caitanya Vaịṣnava Vedānta of Jīva Gosvāmī: When Knowledge Meets Devotion (review) lels that allow him to reach a more harmonious view. Although he quotes Martha Nussbaum and at places convincingly argues against MacIntyre to gain some methodological ground for his comparative study, it seems to me he often sees identities a little too easily, writing that "both" Aristotle and Confucius reflect about X, when in fact the former does so about X and the latter about X', while X is not the same as X'. The metaphor of friends as "mirrors" seems innocent, but applying it here as Yu does can be misleading. Aristotle and Confucius were not friends. They never met and they never saw each other. They did not "spend time together" and "share lives" (p. 214), as would be required for being friends in Aristotle's sense. There was no dialogue between the two that might have overcome various kinds of incommensurability. Instead, it is we who compare them from the outside, and we can be mistaken in our judgments and scenarios, as we can be misled by words from different languages that are false cognates (false friends). If there is a dialogue, it begins only now, with people like Jiyuan Yu. Despite such concerns, Yu's book http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Caitanya Vaịṣnava Vedānta of Jīva Gosvāmī: When Knowledge Meets Devotion (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 60 (2) – Apr 24, 2010

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

lels that allow him to reach a more harmonious view. Although he quotes Martha Nussbaum and at places convincingly argues against MacIntyre to gain some methodological ground for his comparative study, it seems to me he often sees identities a little too easily, writing that "both" Aristotle and Confucius reflect about X, when in fact the former does so about X and the latter about X', while X is not the same as X'. The metaphor of friends as "mirrors" seems innocent, but applying it here as Yu does can be misleading. Aristotle and Confucius were not friends. They never met and they never saw each other. They did not "spend time together" and "share lives" (p. 214), as would be required for being friends in Aristotle's sense. There was no dialogue between the two that might have overcome various kinds of incommensurability. Instead, it is we who compare them from the outside, and we can be mistaken in our judgments and scenarios, as we can be misled by words from different languages that are false cognates (false friends). If there is a dialogue, it begins only now, with people like Jiyuan Yu. Despite such concerns, Yu's book

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 24, 2010

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