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The Burden of the Double Question

The Burden of the Double Question R E V I E W E S S AY S Lewis & Clark College Angelina Chin. Bound to Emancipate: Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong Kong. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 278 pp. $85.00 (cloth/e-book). Margaret Kuo. Intolerable Cruelty: Marriage, Law, and Society in Early Twentieth-Century China. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 235 pp. $75.00 (cloth/e-book). Back in the early 1980s, when I had the good luck to discover Chinese history, it was possible to read and keep up with everything published in English on the topic of women, family, gender, and sexuality in China. It has been a long time since anyone I know of could make that claim. In the late 1980s the field picked up momentum, and in the 1990s it seemed to expand exponentially. Gail Hershatter's authoritative 2007 review of the post-1970 Anglophone literature on women in Chinese history, anthropology, politics, and sociology cited approximately 650 books and articles. A rough-and-ready search using those same parameters suggests that, since 2007, the reading list has grown by at least another 50 percent. A better sense of the overall size of Western scholarship on the field can be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
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Abstract

R E V I E W E S S AY S Lewis & Clark College Angelina Chin. Bound to Emancipate: Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong Kong. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 278 pp. $85.00 (cloth/e-book). Margaret Kuo. Intolerable Cruelty: Marriage, Law, and Society in Early Twentieth-Century China. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 235 pp. $75.00 (cloth/e-book). Back in the early 1980s, when I had the good luck to discover Chinese history, it was possible to read and keep up with everything published in English on the topic of women, family, gender, and sexuality in China. It has been a long time since anyone I know of could make that claim. In the late 1980s the field picked up momentum, and in the 1990s it seemed to expand exponentially. Gail Hershatter's authoritative 2007 review of the post-1970 Anglophone literature on women in Chinese history, anthropology, politics, and sociology cited approximately 650 books and articles. A rough-and-ready search using those same parameters suggests that, since 2007, the reading list has grown by at least another 50 percent. A better sense of the overall size of Western scholarship on the field can be

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 20, 2015

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