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The Buddhist Unconscious: The Alaya-vijnana in the Context of Indian Buddhist Thought (review)

The Buddhist Unconscious: The Alaya-vijnana in the Context of Indian Buddhist Thought (review) In the last essay, Glen A. Hayes discusses the same metaphor of fluid transactions and transfers used by the Vaisnava Sahajiya tradition of medieval Bengal. Å ÇÇ He focuses on the metaphorical structure of the cosmophysiology (dehatattva) and the psychophysical ritual practices (sadhana) of the Sahajiya described in AmrtarÅ Ås Ç atnavlõ. Hayes refers to the methodological analyses of George Lakoff and Mark Å Å Johnson, and draws upon their notions of ``image schemata'' and ``metaphorical projections,'' which he finds useful in demonstrating some new ways of approaching the idea of embodiment, liberation, and transformation of the physical body into a subtle, interior ``divine body.'' He believes that by examining the use of these metaphors one can not only ``unpack'' the structure of tantric worlds but also find ways of connecting these esoteric systems to more everyday human problems, perceptions, and tendencies (p. 163). Hayes argues that in the case of the Vaisnava Sahajiya these Ås, ÇÇ kinds of bodily experiences, image schemata, and metaphorical projections were essentially influenced by the medieval Bengali language, culture, religion, and even geography (p. 166). One of the most persuasive and universal observations he makes in the conclusion is that metaphor is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Buddhist Unconscious: The Alaya-vijnana in the Context of Indian Buddhist Thought (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (2) – May 2, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

In the last essay, Glen A. Hayes discusses the same metaphor of fluid transactions and transfers used by the Vaisnava Sahajiya tradition of medieval Bengal. Å ÇÇ He focuses on the metaphorical structure of the cosmophysiology (dehatattva) and the psychophysical ritual practices (sadhana) of the Sahajiya described in AmrtarÅ Ås Ç atnavlõ. Hayes refers to the methodological analyses of George Lakoff and Mark Å Å Johnson, and draws upon their notions of ``image schemata'' and ``metaphorical projections,'' which he finds useful in demonstrating some new ways of approaching the idea of embodiment, liberation, and transformation of the physical body into a subtle, interior ``divine body.'' He believes that by examining the use of these metaphors one can not only ``unpack'' the structure of tantric worlds but also find ways of connecting these esoteric systems to more everyday human problems, perceptions, and tendencies (p. 163). Hayes argues that in the case of the Vaisnava Sahajiya these Ås, ÇÇ kinds of bodily experiences, image schemata, and metaphorical projections were essentially influenced by the medieval Bengali language, culture, religion, and even geography (p. 166). One of the most persuasive and universal observations he makes in the conclusion is that metaphor is

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 2, 2005

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