The Broken Seals: Part One of The Marshes of Mount Liang (review)

The Broken Seals: Part One of The Marshes of Mount Liang (review) ??6 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1997 tion to taijiquan, where the experience exists only for the performer. In so doing, however, she inadvertently makes the practice of taijiquan seem narcissistic, or at least solipsistic. It is surprising that she says little about qi or about breath, though she makes meaningful and quite interesting remarks about the correct use of the eyes, head, and neck. Various other qualities and ideals and effects associated with taijiquan are cited, but it is not clear how any of these, or the combination of them, is unique to it. A sense of harmony, multilevel perception, and so on can be experienced in many other activities that involve the use of mind and body together--including martial arts, sports, dance, and playing musical instruments. In a short review it is not possible to list the many historical inaccuracies and distortions of interpretation in this book (nor the many misprints). One has the feeling that Sophia Delza is an extremely good classroom teacher ofWu-style taijiquan, and she has earned her niche in its history. Unfortunately this book will do little to further her reputation. David Waterhouse University of Toronto David Waterhouse is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Broken Seals: Part One of The Marshes of Mount Liang (review)

China Review International, Volume 4 (1) – Mar 30, 1997

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

??6 China Review International: Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1997 tion to taijiquan, where the experience exists only for the performer. In so doing, however, she inadvertently makes the practice of taijiquan seem narcissistic, or at least solipsistic. It is surprising that she says little about qi or about breath, though she makes meaningful and quite interesting remarks about the correct use of the eyes, head, and neck. Various other qualities and ideals and effects associated with taijiquan are cited, but it is not clear how any of these, or the combination of them, is unique to it. A sense of harmony, multilevel perception, and so on can be experienced in many other activities that involve the use of mind and body together--including martial arts, sports, dance, and playing musical instruments. In a short review it is not possible to list the many historical inaccuracies and distortions of interpretation in this book (nor the many misprints). One has the feeling that Sophia Delza is an extremely good classroom teacher ofWu-style taijiquan, and she has earned her niche in its history. Unfortunately this book will do little to further her reputation. David Waterhouse University of Toronto David Waterhouse is

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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