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The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China by Macabe Keliher (review)

The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China by Macabe Keliher (review) Reviews  Macabe Keliher. The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China. Berkeley: University of California Press, . ix,  pp. Hardcover $., ISBN ----. Macabe Keliher’s The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China makes a substantial contribution to our understanding of the way that China’s Manchu conquerors created an effective synthesis of Chinese and Manchu traditions of governance. In the process, he sheds useful light on a vigorous and ongoing scholarly debate over the degree to which alien conquerors of China were “sinicized”—that is, “absorbed by the sedentary culture of the conquered and falling into the trap of losing their internal justifications and thus [their] rule” (p. ). Keliher refers briefly to this debate at the end of his “Introduction,” identifying, on the one hand, scholars who argue that “The Manchu sovereigns did not abandon their Manchu identity but rather enforced it through language, dress, textual projects, and military institutions and practices,” and, on the other, those who emphasize that “Chinese personnel and practices structured the state and informed almost all of life in the Qing, from political communications to community funerals” (pp. –). Keliher is clearly more sympathetic to the former view http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China by Macabe Keliher (review)

China Review International , Volume 25 (2) – Jul 23, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews  Macabe Keliher. The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China. Berkeley: University of California Press, . ix,  pp. Hardcover $., ISBN ----. Macabe Keliher’s The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China makes a substantial contribution to our understanding of the way that China’s Manchu conquerors created an effective synthesis of Chinese and Manchu traditions of governance. In the process, he sheds useful light on a vigorous and ongoing scholarly debate over the degree to which alien conquerors of China were “sinicized”—that is, “absorbed by the sedentary culture of the conquered and falling into the trap of losing their internal justifications and thus [their] rule” (p. ). Keliher refers briefly to this debate at the end of his “Introduction,” identifying, on the one hand, scholars who argue that “The Manchu sovereigns did not abandon their Manchu identity but rather enforced it through language, dress, textual projects, and military institutions and practices,” and, on the other, those who emphasize that “Chinese personnel and practices structured the state and informed almost all of life in the Qing, from political communications to community funerals” (pp. –). Keliher is clearly more sympathetic to the former view

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 23, 2020

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