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The Archaeology of Central Philippine, A Study Chiefly of the Iron Age and Its Relationships (review)

The Archaeology of Central Philippine, A Study Chiefly of the Iron Age and Its Relationships... asian perspectives 44(2) fall 2005 wholeheartedly endorse this particular conclusion. A few details of Mijares' instructive and useful study could be queried on technical grounds. His operational definition of stone tools would exclude those with steep edges, which might indeed be considered optimal for certain tasks like scraping, as well as ``microliths,'' which would have been hafted prior to use. The seventeen experimental flakes of andesite and chert may not be considered a suciently large reference assemblage to determine a reliable usewear signature, particularly in view of the quantity of cross-indexed variables (artifact lithology, type of activity, and worked material) covered by the experiments. As hinted above, consideration does not appear to have been accorded to abrasion between deposit and artifact and other potential mechanisms of edge damage beside use wear. There also does not seem to be any photographic documentation of the e¤ects of cutting deer meat on the edges of andesite flakes, even though p. 52 refers to Plate 16, which is meant to show this. Finally, Mijares' assumption that the type of hard material being worked cannot be reliably discerned from use wear may be too pessimistic, in view of Daniel Daven- port's (2003) identification http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

The Archaeology of Central Philippine, A Study Chiefly of the Iron Age and Its Relationships (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 44 (2) – Nov 21, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
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Abstract

asian perspectives 44(2) fall 2005 wholeheartedly endorse this particular conclusion. A few details of Mijares' instructive and useful study could be queried on technical grounds. His operational definition of stone tools would exclude those with steep edges, which might indeed be considered optimal for certain tasks like scraping, as well as ``microliths,'' which would have been hafted prior to use. The seventeen experimental flakes of andesite and chert may not be considered a suciently large reference assemblage to determine a reliable usewear signature, particularly in view of the quantity of cross-indexed variables (artifact lithology, type of activity, and worked material) covered by the experiments. As hinted above, consideration does not appear to have been accorded to abrasion between deposit and artifact and other potential mechanisms of edge damage beside use wear. There also does not seem to be any photographic documentation of the e¤ects of cutting deer meat on the edges of andesite flakes, even though p. 52 refers to Plate 16, which is meant to show this. Finally, Mijares' assumption that the type of hard material being worked cannot be reliably discerned from use wear may be too pessimistic, in view of Daniel Daven- port's (2003) identification

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 21, 2005

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