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The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights by Robin Blackburn (review)

The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights by Robin Blackburn (review) journal of world history, december 2012 than some of us might have allowed for, the seventh century did have some "national" elements to it. Or, perhaps this might be read as a reminder that there were imperial elements with which the twentiethcentury nation continued to have to reckon--and these elements have a long and complexly interesting history. tom looser New York University The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights. By robin blackburn. London: Verso Books, 2011. 512 pp. $34.95 (cloth). The narrative of African slavery in the Americas has rightly become a topic of considerable scholarly attention. In the past half-century it has steadily moved from the periphery of historical analysis to the center as historians increasingly consider both the institution of slavery and experiences of the enslaved Africans who between 1500 and 1820 "outnumbered European migrants by four to one" (p. 1). The colonization of the Americas, displacement and death of innumerable American Indians, growth of plantation slavery, uprooting of some twelve million Africans, and development of imperialism, commercial capitalism, and industrialization impacted four continents for some four hundred years. This is, indeed, a broad story in its own right, worthy of its place in global http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights by Robin Blackburn (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (4) – May 24, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2012 than some of us might have allowed for, the seventh century did have some "national" elements to it. Or, perhaps this might be read as a reminder that there were imperial elements with which the twentiethcentury nation continued to have to reckon--and these elements have a long and complexly interesting history. tom looser New York University The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights. By robin blackburn. London: Verso Books, 2011. 512 pp. $34.95 (cloth). The narrative of African slavery in the Americas has rightly become a topic of considerable scholarly attention. In the past half-century it has steadily moved from the periphery of historical analysis to the center as historians increasingly consider both the institution of slavery and experiences of the enslaved Africans who between 1500 and 1820 "outnumbered European migrants by four to one" (p. 1). The colonization of the Americas, displacement and death of innumerable American Indians, growth of plantation slavery, uprooting of some twelve million Africans, and development of imperialism, commercial capitalism, and industrialization impacted four continents for some four hundred years. This is, indeed, a broad story in its own right, worthy of its place in global

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 24, 2012

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