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The Aesthetic Concept of Yi 意 in Chinese Calligraphic Creation

The Aesthetic Concept of Yi 意 in Chinese Calligraphic Creation <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article proposes that the aesthetic concept of <i>yi</i> is essential for understanding the creative process and the nature of creativity in calligraphy and in wider Chinese aesthetic discourse. This article divides the <i>yi</i> in calligraphic creation into two types—the voluntative <i>yi</i> that refers to the calligrapher&apos;s intention, and the cognitive <i>yi</i> that denotes the "idea" within the artist&apos;s mind. The voluntative <i>yi</i> is further divided into two aspects—<i>youyi</i> (being intentional) and <i>wuyi</i> (not being intentional). The discussion of the cognitive aspect of <i>yi</i> engages Yu-Kung Kao&apos;s understanding of the term as the moldable substance of the mind.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Aesthetic Concept of Yi 意 in Chinese Calligraphic Creation

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (3) – Aug 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article proposes that the aesthetic concept of <i>yi</i> is essential for understanding the creative process and the nature of creativity in calligraphy and in wider Chinese aesthetic discourse. This article divides the <i>yi</i> in calligraphic creation into two types—the voluntative <i>yi</i> that refers to the calligrapher&apos;s intention, and the cognitive <i>yi</i> that denotes the "idea" within the artist&apos;s mind. The voluntative <i>yi</i> is further divided into two aspects—<i>youyi</i> (being intentional) and <i>wuyi</i> (not being intentional). The discussion of the cognitive aspect of <i>yi</i> engages Yu-Kung Kao&apos;s understanding of the term as the moldable substance of the mind.</p>

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 8, 2018

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