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Te Reo Maori: The Past 20 Years and Looking Forward

Te Reo Maori: The Past 20 Years and Looking Forward Te Reo Mâori: The Past 20 Years and Looking Forward1 Tamati Reedy university of waikato This paper outlines the current population situation of Mâori in Aotearoa/ New Zealand as a backdrop to the developments of the Mâori language revitalization efforts over the past two decades, and then traverses some issues that will affect the language as it moves into the new millennium. MÂORI POPULATION. In 1840 when the Mâori people signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown, Mâori was the main ethnic group, with a population numbering between 200,000 and 250,000. But by the turn of the century, swamped by land-hungry British colonists and the outbreak of wars and diseases, the Mâori population had fallen to a low of 42,000. A memorial stands on One Tree Hill in the City of Auckland dedicated to the memory of "a dying race." The 1996 Census has shown, however, the resilience of the Mâori. That census showed that close to 580,000, or 17.3% of the total New Zealand population said they were of Mâori descent (Statistics New Zealand, 1998:14). The Mâori population increased the most during the 1950s and 1960s and has slowed during the past two decades. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Te Reo Maori: The Past 20 Years and Looking Forward

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 6, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Te Reo Mâori: The Past 20 Years and Looking Forward1 Tamati Reedy university of waikato This paper outlines the current population situation of Mâori in Aotearoa/ New Zealand as a backdrop to the developments of the Mâori language revitalization efforts over the past two decades, and then traverses some issues that will affect the language as it moves into the new millennium. MÂORI POPULATION. In 1840 when the Mâori people signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown, Mâori was the main ethnic group, with a population numbering between 200,000 and 250,000. But by the turn of the century, swamped by land-hungry British colonists and the outbreak of wars and diseases, the Mâori population had fallen to a low of 42,000. A memorial stands on One Tree Hill in the City of Auckland dedicated to the memory of "a dying race." The 1996 Census has shown, however, the resilience of the Mâori. That census showed that close to 580,000, or 17.3% of the total New Zealand population said they were of Mâori descent (Statistics New Zealand, 1998:14). The Mâori population increased the most during the 1950s and 1960s and has slowed during the past two decades. The

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2000

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