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Te-ch'uan Jih-ben Lun-yü ch'üan-shih shih-lun (review)

Te-ch'uan Jih-ben Lun-yü ch'üan-shih shih-lun (review) Sim's book is extremely instructive in bringing two virtue-oriented traditions together. At the same time, it is not shy of delving deep into theoretical moral issues faced by both traditions. Te-ch'uan Jih-ben Lun-yu ch'uan-shih shih-lun (Tokugawa ¨ ¨ Japanese interpretations of the Analects: A historical inquiry). By Huang Chun-chieh . Taipei: Taiwan Ta-hsueh Chu-ban Chung-hsin (National ¨ Taiwan University Press), 2006. Pp. 402 þ 20. Reviewed by John A. Tucker East Carolina University Interpreters of Confucian thought in Japan find themselves inevitably addressing the question of whether the study of Confucianism by Japanese scholars is fundamentally different from the study of Confucianism by Chinese scholars. At issue is whether there are significant variances in conceptual orientations, sociopolitical contexts, historical circumstances, or hermeneutic tendencies that make Chinese and Japanese understandings of what seem to be the same texts profoundly different in interpretive outcome. Bob Wakabayashi has characterized two diametrically opposed positions related to this question in terms of what he calls the ``gyoza-manju controversy.'' ¯ ¯ Wakabayashi notes how some Japanese believe that just as gyoza and jiaozi (fried ¯ dumplings) are written with the same characters , they refer, naturally enough, to essentially the same dish, whether cooked http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Te-ch'uan Jih-ben Lun-yü ch'üan-shih shih-lun (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 59 (2) – Apr 17, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

Sim's book is extremely instructive in bringing two virtue-oriented traditions together. At the same time, it is not shy of delving deep into theoretical moral issues faced by both traditions. Te-ch'uan Jih-ben Lun-yu ch'uan-shih shih-lun (Tokugawa ¨ ¨ Japanese interpretations of the Analects: A historical inquiry). By Huang Chun-chieh . Taipei: Taiwan Ta-hsueh Chu-ban Chung-hsin (National ¨ Taiwan University Press), 2006. Pp. 402 þ 20. Reviewed by John A. Tucker East Carolina University Interpreters of Confucian thought in Japan find themselves inevitably addressing the question of whether the study of Confucianism by Japanese scholars is fundamentally different from the study of Confucianism by Chinese scholars. At issue is whether there are significant variances in conceptual orientations, sociopolitical contexts, historical circumstances, or hermeneutic tendencies that make Chinese and Japanese understandings of what seem to be the same texts profoundly different in interpretive outcome. Bob Wakabayashi has characterized two diametrically opposed positions related to this question in terms of what he calls the ``gyoza-manju controversy.'' ¯ ¯ Wakabayashi notes how some Japanese believe that just as gyoza and jiaozi (fried ¯ dumplings) are written with the same characters , they refer, naturally enough, to essentially the same dish, whether cooked

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 17, 2009

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