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Syntatic and Lexical Factors Conditioning the Diffusion of Sound Change

Syntatic and Lexical Factors Conditioning the Diffusion of Sound Change Syntactic and Lexical Factors Conditioning Mark Donohue national university of singapore A sound change may propagate through a language in different ways. Different studies attest sound changes spreading at different rates through different phonological and/or phonotactic environments, diffusing through the speaker population (or through different dialects) in different ways, or simply spreading differentially through the lexicon. In there is evidence for a sound change applying at different rates for different grammatical categories, with the sound change advancing in the small set of bound grammatical morphemes perhaps more completely than in free lexemes. This is evidence that syntactic information on parts of speech can affect the diffusion of a sound change through a language, and that bound forms are not necessarily more conservative than free lexemes when it comes to phonological change. 1. WAYS FOR CHANGE TO DIFFUSE.1 While there are many described instances of the exceptionless application of sound changes throughout a language, following the Neogrammarian model, there are many instances in which a sound change is found to apply to only some subset of the possible target words in a language. In these cases, the application of a sound change may be delimited by the phonological or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Syntatic and Lexical Factors Conditioning the Diffusion of Sound Change

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 44 (2) – Dec 20, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Syntactic and Lexical Factors Conditioning Mark Donohue national university of singapore A sound change may propagate through a language in different ways. Different studies attest sound changes spreading at different rates through different phonological and/or phonotactic environments, diffusing through the speaker population (or through different dialects) in different ways, or simply spreading differentially through the lexicon. In there is evidence for a sound change applying at different rates for different grammatical categories, with the sound change advancing in the small set of bound grammatical morphemes perhaps more completely than in free lexemes. This is evidence that syntactic information on parts of speech can affect the diffusion of a sound change through a language, and that bound forms are not necessarily more conservative than free lexemes when it comes to phonological change. 1. WAYS FOR CHANGE TO DIFFUSE.1 While there are many described instances of the exceptionless application of sound changes throughout a language, following the Neogrammarian model, there are many instances in which a sound change is found to apply to only some subset of the possible target words in a language. In these cases, the application of a sound change may be delimited by the phonological or

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 20, 2005

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