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Surviving Paradise: One Year on a Disappearing Island (review)

Surviving Paradise: One Year on a Disappearing Island (review) book and media reviews sages for Layard telling of friends long dead, remembering the killing of seven Presbyterian missionaries in 1914, the last Maki on Atchin in 1942, and their eventual conversion to Christianity. They bemoaned the loss of kastom, although less intensely on Catholic Vao than on Atchin, where most had converted to the Seventh-Day Adventist religion. Haidy Geismar continues the story from 2003 in her superb chapter on "visualising the past on Atchin and Vao" (257­292). She highlights how people incorporate photographic images into historical narratives. Her project, a collaboration with Numa Fred Longga of the Malakula Cultural Centre, not only entailed repatriating photographs from foreign museums to source communities to foster the national reanimation of kastom; it also occasioned indigenous documentation and reflection. Her interlocutors were eager to retrace Layard's steps. In many of her restaged photos, senior men simulate ancestors in situ and embody connections, for example, by touching slit gongs on ancient dancing grounds to emphasize contemporary claims to their ancestral ples (place). Geismar acknowledges how, given "the gender segregation that is at the heart of much customary knowledge and practice on Malakula" (264), men, and especially older men, dominated public meetings and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Surviving Paradise: One Year on a Disappearing Island (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 26, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews sages for Layard telling of friends long dead, remembering the killing of seven Presbyterian missionaries in 1914, the last Maki on Atchin in 1942, and their eventual conversion to Christianity. They bemoaned the loss of kastom, although less intensely on Catholic Vao than on Atchin, where most had converted to the Seventh-Day Adventist religion. Haidy Geismar continues the story from 2003 in her superb chapter on "visualising the past on Atchin and Vao" (257­292). She highlights how people incorporate photographic images into historical narratives. Her project, a collaboration with Numa Fred Longga of the Malakula Cultural Centre, not only entailed repatriating photographs from foreign museums to source communities to foster the national reanimation of kastom; it also occasioned indigenous documentation and reflection. Her interlocutors were eager to retrace Layard's steps. In many of her restaged photos, senior men simulate ancestors in situ and embody connections, for example, by touching slit gongs on ancient dancing grounds to emphasize contemporary claims to their ancestral ples (place). Geismar acknowledges how, given "the gender segregation that is at the heart of much customary knowledge and practice on Malakula" (264), men, and especially older men, dominated public meetings and

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 26, 2011

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