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Sunyata and Otherness: Applying Mutually Transformative Categories from Buddhist-Christian Dialogue in Christology

Sunyata and Otherness: Applying Mutually Transformative Categories from Buddhist-Christian... Susie Paulik Babka University of San Diego "The universe is expanding," the physicists tell us. "But doesn't an expansion of something mean the presupposition of boundaries?" my naïve mind inquires, thinking too much in terms of discrete substances. Can "something" expand "into" nothing, "into" emptiness? Shot through with "dark energy" (the name an intellectual signifier allowing physicists to speak of the ineffable), the immensity of the universe teaches a lesson in humility before mystery and the radically new. Dark energy makes up 74 percent of the universe and is responsible for increasing the rate of the universe's expansion; it may be explained as the energy of empty space, or space devoid of matter and gravity. Although an unobservable phenomenon, dark energy penetrates the known universe as that which counteracts gravity's relationship to matter, causing a negative pressure in regions of the universe devoid of matter to expand. Hence, the energy of emptiness is the reason for the universe's expansion; emptiness is the reason reality is better described by rapid change and impermanence than stasis and immutability. While it would seem that these developments do not impact religious thinking, the Dalai Lama and others have argued that because science http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Sunyata and Otherness: Applying Mutually Transformative Categories from Buddhist-Christian Dialogue in Christology

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Dec 16, 2015

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University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9472
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Abstract

Susie Paulik Babka University of San Diego "The universe is expanding," the physicists tell us. "But doesn't an expansion of something mean the presupposition of boundaries?" my naïve mind inquires, thinking too much in terms of discrete substances. Can "something" expand "into" nothing, "into" emptiness? Shot through with "dark energy" (the name an intellectual signifier allowing physicists to speak of the ineffable), the immensity of the universe teaches a lesson in humility before mystery and the radically new. Dark energy makes up 74 percent of the universe and is responsible for increasing the rate of the universe's expansion; it may be explained as the energy of empty space, or space devoid of matter and gravity. Although an unobservable phenomenon, dark energy penetrates the known universe as that which counteracts gravity's relationship to matter, causing a negative pressure in regions of the universe devoid of matter to expand. Hence, the energy of emptiness is the reason for the universe's expansion; emptiness is the reason reality is better described by rapid change and impermanence than stasis and immutability. While it would seem that these developments do not impact religious thinking, the Dalai Lama and others have argued that because science

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 16, 2015

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