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Su-Un and His World of Symbols: The Founder of Koreas First Indigenous Religion (review)

Su-Un and His World of Symbols: The Founder of Koreas First Indigenous Religion (review) Journal of Korean Religions 2/1 2011 four hours a day just praying for the king and the country. His book will further enable scholars to put into perspective why Koryŏ Buddhism, despite its ‘‘corrupted’’ image, nonetheless became nostalgic for Buddhists during the colonial and post-colonial era in Korea. Hwansoo Ilmee Kim Assistant Professor, Department of Religion/ Asian & Middle Eastern Studies Department Duke University, USA Su-Un and His World of Symbols: The Founder of Korea’s First Indigenous Religion. By Paul Beirne. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009, 236p. A newly published book, Su-Un and His World of Symbols, analyses the symbolic images which Ch’oe Che-u (1824–1864), better known as Su-un, the founder of Donghak (Eastern Learning, which later led to Cheondogyo, one of Korea’s first indigenous religions) had of himself as a religious and cultural leader to communicate with the Lord of Heaven in unity. The author, Professor Paul Beirne from Melbourne’s College of Divinity in Australia, lived and studied in South Korea for fifteen years, and has undertaken various types of research on the Donghak/Cheondogyo religion. The religious or social movements of Donghak deeply influenced Korean society in various ways. However, it is not well known to Westerners that B.B. Weems’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

Su-Un and His World of Symbols: The Founder of Koreas First Indigenous Religion (review)

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 2 (1) – Jun 6, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Journal of Korean Religions 2/1 2011 four hours a day just praying for the king and the country. His book will further enable scholars to put into perspective why Koryŏ Buddhism, despite its ‘‘corrupted’’ image, nonetheless became nostalgic for Buddhists during the colonial and post-colonial era in Korea. Hwansoo Ilmee Kim Assistant Professor, Department of Religion/ Asian & Middle Eastern Studies Department Duke University, USA Su-Un and His World of Symbols: The Founder of Korea’s First Indigenous Religion. By Paul Beirne. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009, 236p. A newly published book, Su-Un and His World of Symbols, analyses the symbolic images which Ch’oe Che-u (1824–1864), better known as Su-un, the founder of Donghak (Eastern Learning, which later led to Cheondogyo, one of Korea’s first indigenous religions) had of himself as a religious and cultural leader to communicate with the Lord of Heaven in unity. The author, Professor Paul Beirne from Melbourne’s College of Divinity in Australia, lived and studied in South Korea for fifteen years, and has undertaken various types of research on the Donghak/Cheondogyo religion. The religious or social movements of Donghak deeply influenced Korean society in various ways. However, it is not well known to Westerners that B.B. Weems’

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 6, 2012

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