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Stories from the Marshall Islands: Bwebwenato Jan Aelon Kein (review)

Stories from the Marshall Islands: Bwebwenato Jan Aelon Kein (review) the contemporary pacific · spring 2003 create the life-worlds of the people they study. custom and heart inform each other in Ambonwari psychological conceptualization. Furthermore, it allows kay to bind different kinds of time (ancestral, historical, personal) into a workable whole that provides the context of Ambonwari lives. Telban lays out this careful analysis of kay primarily in the early parts of the book (though he returns to his analysis and enriches it in almost every chapter). He then links kay to two other concepts: that of path or marriage (konggong) and that of speech, story, or myth (mariawk). With these three concepts as a base, he offers accounts of clanship, naming systems, kinship, marriage, mythology, and religion. All of these discussions are marked both by their attention to detail and by their clarity, and they will prove valuable to regional specialists. At various points throughout the book, Telban discusses the intersection of kay and Ambonwari conceptions of time, and these discussions make temporality a key theme of the book as a whole. Yet even as Telban's considerations of temporality are stimulating and deserve the attention of those interested in temporality and historicity, I have focused this review http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Stories from the Marshall Islands: Bwebwenato Jan Aelon Kein (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 10, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · spring 2003 create the life-worlds of the people they study. custom and heart inform each other in Ambonwari psychological conceptualization. Furthermore, it allows kay to bind different kinds of time (ancestral, historical, personal) into a workable whole that provides the context of Ambonwari lives. Telban lays out this careful analysis of kay primarily in the early parts of the book (though he returns to his analysis and enriches it in almost every chapter). He then links kay to two other concepts: that of path or marriage (konggong) and that of speech, story, or myth (mariawk). With these three concepts as a base, he offers accounts of clanship, naming systems, kinship, marriage, mythology, and religion. All of these discussions are marked both by their attention to detail and by their clarity, and they will prove valuable to regional specialists. At various points throughout the book, Telban discusses the intersection of kay and Ambonwari conceptions of time, and these discussions make temporality a key theme of the book as a whole. Yet even as Telban's considerations of temporality are stimulating and deserve the attention of those interested in temporality and historicity, I have focused this review

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 10, 2003

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