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Staging Tourism: Bodies on Display from Waikiki to Sea World (review)

Staging Tourism: Bodies on Display from Waikiki to Sea World (review) book and media reviews Some readers will be inconvenienced by the lack of a glossary of Polynesian names of genres and instruments, some disappointed that there is no chapter on Rotuma, and some misled by the title--a literal translation of the Hawaiian haku mele (composer[s])-- though the book's focus is on music and dance as products rather than on composers or the processes of musicmaking. Nevertheless, Weavers of Song-- the first large-scale book written specifically and exclusively about the music and dance of Polynesia as a whole, and listed by Choice as an "Outstanding Academic Title" for 2000--is a major contribution to studies of Polynesian music. Its thorough documentation of data (for instance, there are fifty-six endnotes for the nine-page chapter on Niue, and more than 570 titles in the references) makes it a convenient reference tool not only for students and generalists, but also for specialists. Although it does not address theoretical issues of concern to contemporary ethnomusicology (at least as it is practiced by most American scholars), the book is representative of a large and important body of past scholarship. Unquestionably it stands with The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, volume 9: Australia and the Pacific http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Staging Tourism: Bodies on Display from Waikiki to Sea World (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews Some readers will be inconvenienced by the lack of a glossary of Polynesian names of genres and instruments, some disappointed that there is no chapter on Rotuma, and some misled by the title--a literal translation of the Hawaiian haku mele (composer[s])-- though the book's focus is on music and dance as products rather than on composers or the processes of musicmaking. Nevertheless, Weavers of Song-- the first large-scale book written specifically and exclusively about the music and dance of Polynesia as a whole, and listed by Choice as an "Outstanding Academic Title" for 2000--is a major contribution to studies of Polynesian music. Its thorough documentation of data (for instance, there are fifty-six endnotes for the nine-page chapter on Niue, and more than 570 titles in the references) makes it a convenient reference tool not only for students and generalists, but also for specialists. Although it does not address theoretical issues of concern to contemporary ethnomusicology (at least as it is practiced by most American scholars), the book is representative of a large and important body of past scholarship. Unquestionably it stands with The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, volume 9: Australia and the Pacific

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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