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Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900 (review)

Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900 (review) journal of world history, march 2003 lective groups. If there is a theme running throughout Disabled Veterans in History it would appear to be that disabled veterans only become "visible" when they complain. Unlike other groups of the disabled, however, veterans in the past two centuries seem not only successful in this, but may often be considered groundbreakers for the rest of the disabled community. Unified by the cause of their disability, stemming as it did from service to a nation-state, the veterans had the advantage in the modern era in that it was perceived (in most situations) that the nation owed them for their disability. This meant leverage, and once various veterans recognized this they were able to use their condition to effect change in an active manner. At least, this was the situation in several of the selections stemming from the Western experience of war. If there are gaps in the coverage in Disabled Veterans in History, they are addressed by Gerber up front. This, he points out, is a starting point. I would contend that it is as solid a starting point as any could wish. The quality of the scholarship ranges from good to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 14 (1) – Oct 2, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

journal of world history, march 2003 lective groups. If there is a theme running throughout Disabled Veterans in History it would appear to be that disabled veterans only become "visible" when they complain. Unlike other groups of the disabled, however, veterans in the past two centuries seem not only successful in this, but may often be considered groundbreakers for the rest of the disabled community. Unified by the cause of their disability, stemming as it did from service to a nation-state, the veterans had the advantage in the modern era in that it was perceived (in most situations) that the nation owed them for their disability. This meant leverage, and once various veterans recognized this they were able to use their condition to effect change in an active manner. At least, this was the situation in several of the selections stemming from the Western experience of war. If there are gaps in the coverage in Disabled Veterans in History, they are addressed by Gerber up front. This, he points out, is a starting point. I would contend that it is as solid a starting point as any could wish. The quality of the scholarship ranges from good to

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 2, 2003

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