Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

South Efate Phonological History

South Efate Phonological History John Lynch university of the south pacific The South Efate language in central Vanuatu forms a transition between the phonologically more conservative languages to the north and the more "aberrant" languages to the south. Based on more data than were available to Clark (1985), a more detailed phonological history of South Efate is presented here. Particular attention is paid to a low-vowel dissimilation rule and to rules deleting ²nal vowels and ²nal consonants, which Lynch (to appear a) suggests are shared with the Southern Vanuatu languages and thus constitute evidence for subgrouping South Efate with Southern Vanuatu. I also add to the growing literature on instances of low-vowel dissimilation in Oceanic languages (Blust 1996a, b) without, however, bringing us any nearer to an integrated explanation of this phenomenon. 1. INTRODUCTION. Three languages are native to Efate in Central Vanuatu. I²ra-Mele is a Polynesian Outlier spoken by about 3,500 people on I²ra Island in Vila harbor and in Mele (Imere) village just outside Vanuatu's capital Port Vila. Nakanamanga is a dialect chain, whose component dialects are spoken by almost ten thousand people in the villages of northern Efate, on the western and northern offshore islands of Lelepa, Moso, Nguna, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

South Efate Phonological History

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 39 (2) – Dec 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/south-efate-phonological-history-WYbqm34IQf
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Lynch university of the south pacific The South Efate language in central Vanuatu forms a transition between the phonologically more conservative languages to the north and the more "aberrant" languages to the south. Based on more data than were available to Clark (1985), a more detailed phonological history of South Efate is presented here. Particular attention is paid to a low-vowel dissimilation rule and to rules deleting ²nal vowels and ²nal consonants, which Lynch (to appear a) suggests are shared with the Southern Vanuatu languages and thus constitute evidence for subgrouping South Efate with Southern Vanuatu. I also add to the growing literature on instances of low-vowel dissimilation in Oceanic languages (Blust 1996a, b) without, however, bringing us any nearer to an integrated explanation of this phenomenon. 1. INTRODUCTION. Three languages are native to Efate in Central Vanuatu. I²ra-Mele is a Polynesian Outlier spoken by about 3,500 people on I²ra Island in Vila harbor and in Mele (Imere) village just outside Vanuatu's capital Port Vila. Nakanamanga is a dialect chain, whose component dialects are spoken by almost ten thousand people in the villages of northern Efate, on the western and northern offshore islands of Lelepa, Moso, Nguna,

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.