Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Some Remarks on Stress, Syncope, and Gemination in Mussau

Some Remarks on Stress, Syncope, and Gemination in Mussau Squib Some Remarks on 1 Robert Blust university of hawai`i Contrary to theoretical expectation, Mussau, a language spoken in the St. Matthias archipelago in northwest Melanesia, has developed some geminate consonants through the loss of stressed vowels. It is argued that other considerations have overridden considerations of stress in geminate formation, not only in Mussau, but in many other Oceanic languages. Specifically, vowels tend to delete between identical consonants in partial reduplications, a tendency that accords closely with Odden's (1988) arguments against the Obligatory Contour Principle, particularly as it applies to antigemination. On the basis of ²eldwork conducted in 1975, Blust (1984:174ff) reported the presence of geminate consonants in Mussau, spoken in the St. Matthias archipelago immediately to the northwest of the island of New Ireland in western Melanesia. These segments occur in both initial and intervocalic positions and, according to my earlier publication "can ... be attributed to a synchronic rule of syncope [that] deletes the vowel of the ²rst of two successive identical syllables." In most cases, alternative pronunciations were given in which the geminate consonant corresponds to a C1VC1- sequence; in other cases no such alternative was recorded. Longer forms were said to represent the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Some Remarks on Stress, Syncope, and Gemination in Mussau

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 40 (1) – Jan 6, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/some-remarks-on-stress-syncope-and-gemination-in-mussau-60QnQPR66Q
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Squib Some Remarks on 1 Robert Blust university of hawai`i Contrary to theoretical expectation, Mussau, a language spoken in the St. Matthias archipelago in northwest Melanesia, has developed some geminate consonants through the loss of stressed vowels. It is argued that other considerations have overridden considerations of stress in geminate formation, not only in Mussau, but in many other Oceanic languages. Specifically, vowels tend to delete between identical consonants in partial reduplications, a tendency that accords closely with Odden's (1988) arguments against the Obligatory Contour Principle, particularly as it applies to antigemination. On the basis of ²eldwork conducted in 1975, Blust (1984:174ff) reported the presence of geminate consonants in Mussau, spoken in the St. Matthias archipelago immediately to the northwest of the island of New Ireland in western Melanesia. These segments occur in both initial and intervocalic positions and, according to my earlier publication "can ... be attributed to a synchronic rule of syncope [that] deletes the vowel of the ²rst of two successive identical syllables." In most cases, alternative pronunciations were given in which the geminate consonant corresponds to a C1VC1- sequence; in other cases no such alternative was recorded. Longer forms were said to represent the

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2001

There are no references for this article.