Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Some Observations on Proto-Austronesian *t to k

Some Observations on Proto-Austronesian *t to k Notes Anthony P. Grant EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, ORMSKIRK, uk 1. INTRODUCTION.1 This note provides information on another language that exhibits the PMP *t > k change discussed in Blust (2004), namely Makuva of East Timor, and suggests that this change (which also involves an apparent merger of original *k and *t) has not come about through substratum in³uence from the neighboring dominant non-An language Fataluku. The author also takes issue with some misunderstandings of Caddoan data in the subsequent squib by Donohue (2006), and presents the correct facts. 2. PMP *T > K: ANOTHER INSTANCE. The recent squib by Mark Donohue (Donohue 2006) addresses some of the issues raised in the account provided by Blust (2004) of the change from PMP *t to /k/ in some 43 daughter languages. This change actually represents at least 20 historically independent instances of *t > k change, including three historically separate instances of this in Polynesian. Striking soundchanges in Austronesian are not infrequent, as the extensive treatment of ten such changes in Blust (2005) makes clear,2 but the change of *t > k is unusually widespread within Austronesian, and the nature of its geographical and genetic distribution makes it clear that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Some Observations on Proto-Austronesian *t to k

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 45 (2) – Jan 24, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/some-observations-on-proto-austronesian-t-to-k-XhYGMS0Bdq
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Notes Anthony P. Grant EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, ORMSKIRK, uk 1. INTRODUCTION.1 This note provides information on another language that exhibits the PMP *t > k change discussed in Blust (2004), namely Makuva of East Timor, and suggests that this change (which also involves an apparent merger of original *k and *t) has not come about through substratum in³uence from the neighboring dominant non-An language Fataluku. The author also takes issue with some misunderstandings of Caddoan data in the subsequent squib by Donohue (2006), and presents the correct facts. 2. PMP *T > K: ANOTHER INSTANCE. The recent squib by Mark Donohue (Donohue 2006) addresses some of the issues raised in the account provided by Blust (2004) of the change from PMP *t to /k/ in some 43 daughter languages. This change actually represents at least 20 historically independent instances of *t > k change, including three historically separate instances of this in Polynesian. Striking soundchanges in Austronesian are not infrequent, as the extensive treatment of ten such changes in Blust (2005) makes clear,2 but the change of *t > k is unusually widespread within Austronesian, and the nature of its geographical and genetic distribution makes it clear that

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 24, 2006

There are no references for this article.