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Social Discord and Bodily Disorder: Healing among the Yupno of Papua New Guinea (review)

Social Discord and Bodily Disorder: Healing among the Yupno of Papua New Guinea (review) the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) and political obligations surrounding marriage and bride-price practices. These sections assume that the reader has a working knowledge of basic anthropological approaches to kinship structures or is willing to learn them. In order to successfully understand the intricacies and nuances of the powerful data and analysis that follows, this kind of theoretical exposition and knowledge cannot be avoided. The rewards are well worth the intellectual effort of delving deeply into Yupno thought and kinship practices in order to realize their centrality to this people's way of life and cognitive processes around sickness and healing. Together, these three early chapters provide the necessary theoretical and informational background for the reader to understand the events recounted in the particular case that serves to provide extensive data and an intellectual bridge to the second, more analytical half of the book. This central case involves the prolonged serious illness of the infant Nstasinge, whom Keck encountered first in 1987. Here the author expands through richer detail and contextualization her previously published journal articles about this child and his kin groups' healing attempts, focusing in particular on their diagnostic and therapeutic efforts. In this pivotal chapter (chapter http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Social Discord and Bodily Disorder: Healing among the Yupno of Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) and political obligations surrounding marriage and bride-price practices. These sections assume that the reader has a working knowledge of basic anthropological approaches to kinship structures or is willing to learn them. In order to successfully understand the intricacies and nuances of the powerful data and analysis that follows, this kind of theoretical exposition and knowledge cannot be avoided. The rewards are well worth the intellectual effort of delving deeply into Yupno thought and kinship practices in order to realize their centrality to this people's way of life and cognitive processes around sickness and healing. Together, these three early chapters provide the necessary theoretical and informational background for the reader to understand the events recounted in the particular case that serves to provide extensive data and an intellectual bridge to the second, more analytical half of the book. This central case involves the prolonged serious illness of the infant Nstasinge, whom Keck encountered first in 1987. Here the author expands through richer detail and contextualization her previously published journal articles about this child and his kin groups' healing attempts, focusing in particular on their diagnostic and therapeutic efforts. In this pivotal chapter (chapter

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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