Snow in Ulan Bator

Snow in Ulan Bator JIANG TAO Monday morning I got up early, thinking I was h ome, scrounged a drink of water in the bathr oom, turned my socks inside out and slipped them o n as if what happened last night was nothing. But it’s snowing outside. Aer o ft nly one nig ht the grassland retreats in h aste, exposing a great cluster of Japanes e cars sinking into bottomless mud. This I’m actually already familiar w ith It’s been this way for more than a century, from Tokyo to B eijing, and now again her e. Straight-nosed wide-mouthed commuters, their faces exhausted from stuffing thems elves with potatoes cooked in the freezing w ind, are going to work now, shotguns on their sho ulders replaced by a forest of black umbrellas. But I’m still in my underwe ar, switching quickly between BBC and CNN. e w Th hite-haired anchorman always looked arroga nt, but now he speaks proletarian English. I’m skeptical, understanding half of what h e says. I guess that a great shift might co me —but not local mountains becoming golden hi lls nor Pyongyang turning into Beijing. 49 I sense that what was loomin g is coming, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

JIANG TAO Monday morning I got up early, thinking I was h ome, scrounged a drink of water in the bathr oom, turned my socks inside out and slipped them o n as if what happened last night was nothing. But it’s snowing outside. Aer o ft nly one nig ht the grassland retreats in h aste, exposing a great cluster of Japanes e cars sinking into bottomless mud. This I’m actually already familiar w ith It’s been this way for more than a century, from Tokyo to B eijing, and now again her e. Straight-nosed wide-mouthed commuters, their faces exhausted from stuffing thems elves with potatoes cooked in the freezing w ind, are going to work now, shotguns on their sho ulders replaced by a forest of black umbrellas. But I’m still in my underwe ar, switching quickly between BBC and CNN. e w Th hite-haired anchorman always looked arroga nt, but now he speaks proletarian English. I’m skeptical, understanding half of what h e says. I guess that a great shift might co me —but not local mountains becoming golden hi lls nor Pyongyang turning into Beijing. 49 I sense that what was loomin g is coming,

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 10, 2019

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