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Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review)

Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review) book reviews Amy Greenwell Garden, extensive architectural projects may be built for purposes of risk management. She goes on to reason that risk management projects may become part of the intensification strategy ( pp. 148­150). Allen assesses the results of the archaeological research at the Amy Greenwell Garden, and uses empirical data to examine the process of intensification and its archaeological identification. She argues that risk management strategies, usually eclipsed by a focus on the short-term benefits of intensification, are strategies providing longterm benefits. Allen bases her argument on the archaeological evidence of kauiwi construction, and on the timing of their construction. Kuaiwi dominate Kona's landscape, but are associated with prime soils in all Kona ahupua`a. It was only during the seventeenth century that people cultivating the Kona Coast moved into more marginal lands; here they failed to construct soil and moisture-preserving features like the kuaiwi, and this failure resulted in soil erosion. The lack of long-term risk management appears to be an attempt to acquire short-term benefits. Apparent shortsightedness left Kona's populations ``increasingly vulnerable to both agronomic and demographic loss,'' as the same political forces that produced a cohesive agricultural system pushed it too far ( p. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Sigatoka: The Shifting Sands of Fijian Prehistory (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 41 (2)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews Amy Greenwell Garden, extensive architectural projects may be built for purposes of risk management. She goes on to reason that risk management projects may become part of the intensification strategy ( pp. 148­150). Allen assesses the results of the archaeological research at the Amy Greenwell Garden, and uses empirical data to examine the process of intensification and its archaeological identification. She argues that risk management strategies, usually eclipsed by a focus on the short-term benefits of intensification, are strategies providing longterm benefits. Allen bases her argument on the archaeological evidence of kauiwi construction, and on the timing of their construction. Kuaiwi dominate Kona's landscape, but are associated with prime soils in all Kona ahupua`a. It was only during the seventeenth century that people cultivating the Kona Coast moved into more marginal lands; here they failed to construct soil and moisture-preserving features like the kuaiwi, and this failure resulted in soil erosion. The lack of long-term risk management appears to be an attempt to acquire short-term benefits. Apparent shortsightedness left Kona's populations ``increasingly vulnerable to both agronomic and demographic loss,'' as the same political forces that produced a cohesive agricultural system pushed it too far ( p.

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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