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Shingon Refractions: Myōe and the Mantra of Light (review)

Shingon Refractions: Myōe and the Mantra of Light (review) does the normative image of Japanese Pure Land Buddhism actually conform to the actual practice on the ground? My suspicion is that unless these schools were untainted by the syncretistic and pluralistic character of virtually all other forms of Japanese religion, there has always been considerable dissonance between the actual and the ideal, making the heretofore normative model even more problematic. An ethnographic study along these lines would have added an important perspective to this collection. Aside from this omission, the contributors to this volume have begun to fill a gaping lacuna in our understanding of Pure Land practice. Shingon Refractions: Myoe and the Mantra of Light. By Mark Unno. Boston: Wisdom ¯ Publications, 2004. Pp. xiii þ 351. Reviewed by Richard K. Payne Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Until relatively recently, the medieval period of Japanese Buddhism was characterized as one in which the founders of new Buddhist sects promoted simple forms of practice to the general populace in an active critique of the corrupt institutions of mainstream Buddhism. More recently, largely under the influence of Kuroda Toshio, there has been a shift of attention to the interrelations between the major social institutions of medieval Japan, the court, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Shingon Refractions: Myōe and the Mantra of Light (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 57 (2) – Apr 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

does the normative image of Japanese Pure Land Buddhism actually conform to the actual practice on the ground? My suspicion is that unless these schools were untainted by the syncretistic and pluralistic character of virtually all other forms of Japanese religion, there has always been considerable dissonance between the actual and the ideal, making the heretofore normative model even more problematic. An ethnographic study along these lines would have added an important perspective to this collection. Aside from this omission, the contributors to this volume have begun to fill a gaping lacuna in our understanding of Pure Land practice. Shingon Refractions: Myoe and the Mantra of Light. By Mark Unno. Boston: Wisdom ¯ Publications, 2004. Pp. xiii þ 351. Reviewed by Richard K. Payne Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Until relatively recently, the medieval period of Japanese Buddhism was characterized as one in which the founders of new Buddhist sects promoted simple forms of practice to the general populace in an active critique of the corrupt institutions of mainstream Buddhism. More recently, largely under the influence of Kuroda Toshio, there has been a shift of attention to the interrelations between the major social institutions of medieval Japan, the court,

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 23, 2007

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