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Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage (review)

Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage (review) SHAKESPEARE AND THE JAPANESE STAGE. Edited by Takashi Sasayama, J. R. Mulryne, and Margaret Shewring. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 356 pp. + illus. Cloth $64.95 This volume begins and ends with evocations of Ninagawa Yukio's production of The Tempest that was so prominent a part of the 1988 Edinburgh Festival. J. R. Mulryne, in the introductory essay, recalls his own enchantment at the highly stylized performance fusing Shakespeare's last play with a broad range of traditional Japanese theatrical techniques. Robert Hapgood, in the final essay, considers the same production at the Barbican in London to be exhibiting a "too free-wheeling" eclecticism that he found difficult to accept. The distance between these points of view indicates the broad range of material, perspectives, and judgments included in Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage. Japanese scholars of authority in English drama and of their own traditional forms of theatre share chapters with American and English scholars with established reputations in either Asian or Shakespearean theatre studies. The resulting richness, which is both exemplary and thought provoking, presents multiple perspectives on Shakespeare and Japan--a theme that has been developing for at least the last century and in this volume reaches scholarly maturity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 17 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHAKESPEARE AND THE JAPANESE STAGE. Edited by Takashi Sasayama, J. R. Mulryne, and Margaret Shewring. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 356 pp. + illus. Cloth $64.95 This volume begins and ends with evocations of Ninagawa Yukio's production of The Tempest that was so prominent a part of the 1988 Edinburgh Festival. J. R. Mulryne, in the introductory essay, recalls his own enchantment at the highly stylized performance fusing Shakespeare's last play with a broad range of traditional Japanese theatrical techniques. Robert Hapgood, in the final essay, considers the same production at the Barbican in London to be exhibiting a "too free-wheeling" eclecticism that he found difficult to accept. The distance between these points of view indicates the broad range of material, perspectives, and judgments included in Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage. Japanese scholars of authority in English drama and of their own traditional forms of theatre share chapters with American and English scholars with established reputations in either Asian or Shakespearean theatre studies. The resulting richness, which is both exemplary and thought provoking, presents multiple perspectives on Shakespeare and Japan--a theme that has been developing for at least the last century and in this volume reaches scholarly maturity.

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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