Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Seven Contemporary Plays: From the Korean Diaspora in the Americas ed. by Esther Kim Lee (review)

Seven Contemporary Plays: From the Korean Diaspora in the Americas ed. by Esther Kim Lee (review) tions between the colonial-, postcolonial-, Cold War-, and eventually modern-period Korea's struggle to define and align itself in the topdown, colonial, imperialist mobilization model that morphs into an ``ethnodevelopmentalist'' identity, which is simultaneously antagonized by the anticolonial, global proletarian, modernist, nativist cultural expressions. Secondly, it presents thought-provoking discussions of authors and their works rarely given so much room for such treatment for all their lasting, culture-shaping impact, such as Son Ch'ang-sop, Nam Chong-hyon, Chong Pi-sok, and others. Thirdly, it considers modern Korea and its culture in the context of global movements, such as the prolekult movement, communism, anticommunism, developmentalism, Cold War, and (post)colonialism, which is a labor of ``area studies'' and interdisciplinary studies when they are done well. Hughes ends the book not with a tidy conclusion but with a ``reading'' of a painting. This is most fitting, as it reminds readers of the kinds of messy histories, perspectives, and regimes of power and knowledge erected in Korea since the colonial modern period, and that by acknowledging the memories which, ``cannot be laid to rest, . . . [they] can become a verbal-visual history that is not of the past but of the present'' (p. 210). Intended readers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Seven Contemporary Plays: From the Korean Diaspora in the Americas ed. by Esther Kim Lee (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 36 (1) – Nov 27, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/seven-contemporary-plays-from-the-korean-diaspora-in-the-americas-ed-iyMAi6ziGP
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tions between the colonial-, postcolonial-, Cold War-, and eventually modern-period Korea's struggle to define and align itself in the topdown, colonial, imperialist mobilization model that morphs into an ``ethnodevelopmentalist'' identity, which is simultaneously antagonized by the anticolonial, global proletarian, modernist, nativist cultural expressions. Secondly, it presents thought-provoking discussions of authors and their works rarely given so much room for such treatment for all their lasting, culture-shaping impact, such as Son Ch'ang-sop, Nam Chong-hyon, Chong Pi-sok, and others. Thirdly, it considers modern Korea and its culture in the context of global movements, such as the prolekult movement, communism, anticommunism, developmentalism, Cold War, and (post)colonialism, which is a labor of ``area studies'' and interdisciplinary studies when they are done well. Hughes ends the book not with a tidy conclusion but with a ``reading'' of a painting. This is most fitting, as it reminds readers of the kinds of messy histories, perspectives, and regimes of power and knowledge erected in Korea since the colonial modern period, and that by acknowledging the memories which, ``cannot be laid to rest, . . . [they] can become a verbal-visual history that is not of the past but of the present'' (p. 210). Intended readers

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 27, 2012

There are no references for this article.