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Sensational Knowledge: Embodying Culture through Japanese Dance (review)

Sensational Knowledge: Embodying Culture through Japanese Dance (review) relevance of its musical and typical content to kabuki plays" (118), when in fact it first developed within and for kabuki. Translated sections of Kezairoku in the appendix also contain several places where the text translation and accompanying notes can rouse confusion by seeming contractions. She also occasionally uses untranslated Japanese terminology and inconsistently pairs Japanese and English terms, when choosing one language or the other might be clearer. Taken in sum, such details take a toll on the overall work, which is further exacerbated by typographical errors that should have been caught by the editors. A valuable part of the publication is the accompanying CD-ROM, easy to use and cleverly laid out to reference the reader's knowledge of a present-day Kabuki-za program, demonstrating its own "intergeneric links." The material is divided into the "matinee" (Funa Benkei plot) and "evening" (Ataka/Kanjinchö plot) performances, within which superbly reproduced photos, video clips, drawings, and nishiki-e (woodblock prints) illustrate various scenes in their nö, ningyö-jöruri, and kabuki incarnations. Among the kabuki photos reproduced, courtesy of the National Theatre of Japan and the Halford-MacLeod Collection at the University of Edinburgh, are gems of some of the great prewar kabuki actors. For the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Sensational Knowledge: Embodying Culture through Japanese Dance (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 25 (1) – Mar 4, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

relevance of its musical and typical content to kabuki plays" (118), when in fact it first developed within and for kabuki. Translated sections of Kezairoku in the appendix also contain several places where the text translation and accompanying notes can rouse confusion by seeming contractions. She also occasionally uses untranslated Japanese terminology and inconsistently pairs Japanese and English terms, when choosing one language or the other might be clearer. Taken in sum, such details take a toll on the overall work, which is further exacerbated by typographical errors that should have been caught by the editors. A valuable part of the publication is the accompanying CD-ROM, easy to use and cleverly laid out to reference the reader's knowledge of a present-day Kabuki-za program, demonstrating its own "intergeneric links." The material is divided into the "matinee" (Funa Benkei plot) and "evening" (Ataka/Kanjinchö plot) performances, within which superbly reproduced photos, video clips, drawings, and nishiki-e (woodblock prints) illustrate various scenes in their nö, ningyö-jöruri, and kabuki incarnations. Among the kabuki photos reproduced, courtesy of the National Theatre of Japan and the Halford-MacLeod Collection at the University of Edinburgh, are gems of some of the great prewar kabuki actors. For the

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 4, 2007

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