Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Self-Writing, Literary Traditions, and Post-Emancipation Identity: The Case of Mary Seacole

Self-Writing, Literary Traditions, and Post-Emancipation Identity: The Case of Mary Seacole SELF-WRITING, LITERARY TRADITIONS, AND POST-EMANCIPATION IDENTITY: THE CASE OF MARY SEACOLE EVELYN J. HAWTHORNE “ . . . unless I am allowed to tell the story of my life in my own way, I cannot tell it at all.” Written at the height of the Victorian period, The Wonderful Adventures of Mary Seacole in Many Lands (1857) is a paradigmatic black woman’s text of self-authoring that has been lauded as “one of the most readable and rewarding black women’s autobiographies in the nineteenth century” (An- drews, Introduction xxviii). Representing a locus classicus of culturally sanctioned feminine self-reliance, it was written and published in England by Mary Jane Grant Seacole (1805–1881), a free-born Jamaican who achieved fame for her work as a nurse during the Crimean War, meriting several medals. Transgressing gender, race, and class roles as an adventur- ing businesswoman in Jamaica, London, Haiti, New Granada, and Cuba, and as a female who, undaunted by the horrors of the battlefield, deployed herself to the Crimean War, this heroine is extraordinary by any standard. But in addition to its biographical importance, this work is an invaluable means of espying how the free(d) female subject fashioned her identity, from a socially, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Self-Writing, Literary Traditions, and Post-Emancipation Identity: The Case of Mary Seacole

Biography , Volume 23 (2) – Mar 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/self-writing-literary-traditions-and-post-emancipation-identity-the-m3KM6ntOPh
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

SELF-WRITING, LITERARY TRADITIONS, AND POST-EMANCIPATION IDENTITY: THE CASE OF MARY SEACOLE EVELYN J. HAWTHORNE “ . . . unless I am allowed to tell the story of my life in my own way, I cannot tell it at all.” Written at the height of the Victorian period, The Wonderful Adventures of Mary Seacole in Many Lands (1857) is a paradigmatic black woman’s text of self-authoring that has been lauded as “one of the most readable and rewarding black women’s autobiographies in the nineteenth century” (An- drews, Introduction xxviii). Representing a locus classicus of culturally sanctioned feminine self-reliance, it was written and published in England by Mary Jane Grant Seacole (1805–1881), a free-born Jamaican who achieved fame for her work as a nurse during the Crimean War, meriting several medals. Transgressing gender, race, and class roles as an adventur- ing businesswoman in Jamaica, London, Haiti, New Granada, and Cuba, and as a female who, undaunted by the horrors of the battlefield, deployed herself to the Crimean War, this heroine is extraordinary by any standard. But in addition to its biographical importance, this work is an invaluable means of espying how the free(d) female subject fashioned her identity, from a socially,

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.